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FRIENDS of SAINT JOHNSVILLE

P.O. Box 182

St. Johnsville, NY 13452

 

 

HISTORICAL ST. JOHNSVILLE

 

The Water Department
From Aquafacts, Spring 1999
The Official Publication of New York Rural Water Association
St. Johnsville Project Offers the Best Solution to the SWTR
By Doug Smorol, Circuit Rider, 2, NYRWA

It is not too often in my travels across the great State of New York that I come across a Water project that leaves such a strong impression with me that I am compelled to write my magazine article about it. But after a recent visit to the Village of St. Johnsville's new Slow Sand Filter Plant, I was left with a renewed faith in the ability of Professional Engineers to deliver sound engineering principles at a reasonable cost.

Like many small villages, the Village of St. Johnsville was confronted with the problem of complying with the Surface Water Treatment Rule (SWTR). The Congdon Springs that had supplied the village with drinking water for over one hundred years and is classified as a Surface Water Source, would now have to be filtered. The original project called for the construction of a $1.8 million Water Filtration Plant, funding sources were found and approved, but before construction could begin village Officials halted the project and decided to develop a Groundwater source. Engineering for the Well field Project and also the subsequent scaled down Slow Sand Filter was provided by John McDonald Eng., PC of Schenectady, NY. Funding for the $1.8 million project was provided through a grant loan package from the Economic Development Authority and the State Drinking Water SRF.

After completion of the well field it was decided that the remainder of the funding could be utilized to build a scaled down Slow Sand Filtration Plant to utilize the excellent water resource of the Congdon springs. The engineer quickly came up with a design and site location that would allow the system to function by gravity alone, making the Slow Sand Filter Plant very economical to operate and maintain.

Construction began in June of 1998 and the Filters went online in December of 1998. The Village of St. Johnsville was very pleased with the quality of work and the effort to maintain a tight construction schedule by the General Contractor, Delaney Construction Corp. of Mayfield, NY. The Filter Plant is currently producing about 300,000 gallons per day of crystal clear drinking water for the residents of St. Johnsville. On the day I visited the facility the turbidity at the influent side were at 0.3 NTU with the finished water at an impressive .0304 NTU.

The system is designed to be self balancing with the well system, so that on days of peak demand from the Village, should the spring source lag behind and the level of the reservoir drops, the well pumps come on automatically and return the reservoir to optimum operating levels. Each source is capable of operating independently of each other and each is capable of supplying the needs of the Village making this system very attractive to the local NYSDOH. The spring source is disinfected with chlorine gas at the reservoir and the well supply is disinfected with Sodium Hypochlorite solution at the wellhouse.

It was very refreshing to see a project such as the one completed at the St. Johnsville Waterworks, the simplicity of design and attractive exteriors combined with the relatively low cost is a splendid example of how we should be designing and building water plants her in New York State. Over the years I have observed the construction of many facilities where the Engineers placed aesthetics ahead of function and cost overruns and construction delays were common place.

Hats off to John McDonald Eng., P. C. of Schenectady, NY. and the Village of St. Johnsville for a job well done!

Note: The new Filtration Plant was named for Past Mayor Wilfred Kraft. 

 

St. Johnsville is in an enviable situation with water supply, thanks to the foresight of our forefathers. Many thanks to Jeff Swartz, who spent a lot of time in the village archives, gleaning the information and then writing about our water history. Our water system is well thought out and has served the village with a plentiful supply. In 1998, St. Johnsville was given the award for the best tasting water in New York State.

1932 Report of the Municipal Commissioners to the Honorable Village Board

The supply of water for the Village of St. Johnsville is obtained from village water bearing territory in the Town of Ephratah located north of the village. In 1924 a persistent agitation was inaugurated to procure additional water. The old system of spring water which was installed in 1893, had long been inadequate for the demands of the village. This had been supplemented by use of the creek water which was against the orders of the State and dangerous to the health of the community. The late Otis Williams finally headed a demand for more water and entered his name for Village of St. Johnsville President and was elected on a platform calling for an additional water supply. In August of 1924, after first securing a report from engineer James Wells of Rochester, and after holding a public hearing in the matter, a proposition was placed before the people to raise bonds to the extent of $170,000 for the purpose of securing an additional water supply. This was duly approved by a majority of the taxpayers voting at the special election held September 10, 1924.

The proposition called for a new water line from the settling basin in the hollow above the Village of St. Johnsville to certain springs north of Lassellsville and contemplated an all spring water supply.

The Municipal Commission thus enjoined by the people to carry out their wishes, employed James Wells, engineer, to make the plans and engaged the late George C. Butler, attorney, for guidance in legal matters. The necessary steps were taken to procure land and rights and the permission of the state sought. Opposition to the taking of certain springs (Fical and Miles), as well as opposition to the plan itself developed and several hearings were held before the State Conservation Commission before the necessary permission to proceed was granted.

The interjection of legal obstacles and the delays incident thereto interfered with the project to such extent that no work was done during the fall of 1924. The State granted their permit October 29, 1924. This permit prevented the Village of St. Johnsville from taking any of the springs contemplated in the plans (Fical and Miles Springs), but gave them the right to take water from the headwaters of Zimmerman Creek instead. The State Conservation Dept. decided that as the creek itself gave us a much larger supply, practically greater than our needs for many years to come, the springs should be reserved for the village of Lassellsville should they elect to make use of them. This changed the plans somewhat and increased the cost of installation as it required a larger intake dam at the headwaters and the acquiring of considerable land in order to procure a pure and uncontaminated supply.

As a measure of temporary relief, the Municipal Commission caused to be erected a small intake (our present "lower spring intake") on the old Congdon Property where considerable water was running to waste below the old intake (our present "upper spring intake"). Accordingly a small intake was erected several hundred feet below the old intake, a new supply of some 50,000 gallons per day secured and turned into the system. This was brought into use on October 28, 1925 and afforded some relief.

In the meantime, work was progressing on the larger undertaking which consisted of a new 8 inch pipe line extending from the village settling basins (dome area), to and above Lassellsville to the headwaters of Zimmerman Creek, where a large intake dam was erected for the purpose of storing the water and creating sufficient head for the purposes demanded. The bonds were sold, the contract was let for digging and laying of the pipe and the right of way secured over the land, said right of way consisting of a rod (16 feet) each side of the pipe line.

The contract for laying the pipe was let to H.W. Golden & Son of Troy and their work was supervised by engineers representing the Village of St. Johnsville and no complaint has yet been filed that the work was slighted or any detail overlooked. The pipe was the best quality secured from the U.S. Cast Iron Foundry. The fundamental idea in installing the work was to make it as permanent and long lived as modern science could devise. This policy was also pursued in relation to the widened right of way which, while costing the taxpayers for added property, gave them permanent rights to all time to enter on their pipe line without disturbing adjoining landowners.

It has been said that the Village of St. Johnsville entered upon peoples land and disregarded their rights. A glance at the appended report will convince any fair minded person that this is not true. Land rights for the pipe line were acquired by purchase, under terms which we consider liberal. Trespass rights across fields were paid for and even temporary use of land for storing pipe was paid for liberally. As a further effort t create the good will to those who were naturally disturbed by the construction work, it was the policy of the commission to give employment wherever possible to those living near the work, and as a matter of fact, the little intake was constructed almost entirely with Lassellsville and neighborhood labor. Farmers found employment for their teams and many thousands of dollars were distributed in the immediate neighborhood of the construction.

The ensuing litigation which has given rise to some criticism of late was not instigated by the commission until every reasonable effort as settlement had been exhausted. At no time has the commission attempted t coerce or force settlement, but on the contrary have always stood ready to pay any reasonable claim together with something over towards that invisible yet recognized sentimental value which naturally attaches to property long owned by one family. That we failed in this and were finally forced to bring condemnation proceedings in order to avoid defending a multitude on individual law suits in Fulton County is only a measure of self protection. That out offers were fair and reasonable can readily be proven from the allowances made by the Condemnation Commission in Dempster Creek matter which has been determined and in which the allowances of the Condemnation Commission figures very near to the offers made by us. In some cases our offers were more than claimants received in others less, but the aggregate shows very little difference.

The Village of St. Johnsville now owns over 507 acres of water bearing territory in the Town of Ephratah. This land has been cleared of contaminating influences and reforested. Some of the land was well timbered when acquired and fresh planting of over 200,000 trees is said to represent the highest number of trees of any town of its size in the state.

When the project was accepted by the engineers in the State Conservation Dept. in 1924 they said in their letter of approval that the combined yield of the Miles and Fical Springs may not exceed 50,000 gallons per day. All the water that the Village of St. Johnsville can carry through the proposed and existing pipe line can be obtained from its present sources of supply and from Zimmerman Creek. It hardly seems these two smaller sources can be justified if Zimmerman Creek is to be used at all.

From the above it will be noted that the State Engineers were not satisfied that the Village of St. Johnsville could be absolutely sure of an all spring supply and the drought of 1930 justified their judgment. It went further and proved that Zimmerman Creek was also vulnerable, as that source also failed during the height of the dry season. The supply from Fical Spring temporarily suspended and the Miles Spring dropped to about 25,000 gallons.

This unforeseen emergency was not taken into the calculations of any of the engineers, either state or municipal, but it happened. This led to volumes of criticism of the Water Commission, but it should be remembered that the Municipal Commission did not originate the plans which were prepared by engineers and voted and approved by the people.

The only alternative presented by the lesson of 1930 was to make sure it could not happen again and this led to the purchase of Yauney Reservoir, a natural basin two miles above the intake on Zimmerman Creek and which was already equipped with a strong earthwork dam, built in 1879 by St. Johnsville manufacturers to control the stream flow when water power was the only factor known in manufacturing. This splendid reservoir, capable of holding in storage at least a quarter of a billion gallons, forever prevents a water famine, as it can be fed down during dry weather to keep an even stream flow. It should also mitigate against riparian damage claims as it assures a stream flow at the only time when damages could be sustained, that is, during low water and extreme drought. This cost the Village of St. Johnsville $1500 and added materially to the value of the property.

The Village of St. Johnsville owns two fine water projects. The Old System, known as the Congdon property which furnishes an unfailing supply of pure spring water and second the new Zimmerman Creek supply. The old supply will furnish from 250,000 to 300,000 gallons per day. The new supply will furnish from 750,000 per day.

The Village of St. Johnsville owns two distributing reservoirs capable of holding 3,000,000 gallons and the necessary land to protect them (dome area). The Village of St. Johnsville owns about 16 miles of pipe line with rights of two rods the entire length. The village owns over 507 acres of water bearing land mostly forest or reforested. The village owns three intake dams, the necessary gate houses, and the distributing system in the village proper. The village owns the Yauney Reservoir, which is one of the best purchases entered into. It assures an even stream flow and ample water flow for all purposes at the time. This last is the aim and object of all forward looking communities because a good water system is one of the surest inducements to prospective industrial plants.

The money value of the St. Johnsville water system is fully equal to the amount spent and will return a reasonable return. Without this water supply, the Village of St. Johnsville was helpless. With it, the Village of St. Johnsville can look forward to a future worth while, for with our schools, streets, parks and water supply, we have no need to be ashamed.

Your Commissioners have served without reward or desire for reward; often under severe criticism, and seldom receiving praise or commendation. They have devoted a great deal of their time and energy to the problem, and have never charged the village for their services. If the work has been slighted, it is not because we have been negligent; if there are mistakes, they are mistakes of judgment and not of intent; if on the other hand the village is possessed of a valuable property, well built, well planned and functioning perfectly, then we feel content to pass the work of continuance to others. We have faithfully tried to give the village the best water system in the state and we are conscious that we have at least labored honestly and faithfully to that end. Only in due process of time will the full fruit of our efforts be ripened. In the meantime, we are willing to rest our case before the people of the Village of St. Johnsville.

 

St. Johnsville is in an enviable situation with water supply, thanks to the foresight of our forefathers. Many thanks to Jeff Swartz, who spent a lot of time in the village archives, gleaning the information and then writing about our water history. Our water system has been well planned and has served the village with a plentiful supply. In 1998, St. Johnsville was given the award for the best tasting water in New York State.

-On July 10, 1879, the Village of St. Johnsville Board of Trustees deemed it advisable to organize a Board of Water Commissioners pursuant to chapter 181 of the laws of 1875, entitled "An act to authorize the villages of the State of New York to furnish pure and wholesome water to the inhabitants thereof". The board of trustees, who at the time were Jonathan Mosher-president, George Pitcher-trustee, Joe Keyser-trustee, Marvin Wilsey-trustee and BA Ransom-clerk, elected the following officers for the Board of Water Commissioners, Jonathan Mosher president, Marvin Wilsey secretary, George Pitcher treasurer.

-On August 2, 1879 there was held a special election held at the Empire House, a hotel kept by George O. Pitcher, for the purpose shall water taxes be levied and collected. There were 101 ballots cast with 55 for the water tax and 46 against the water tax, the majority being for the water tax to be levied and collected.

-On August 11, 1879 the Board of Water Commissioners resolved that a map be made of the spring known as "Cox Spring" in the Village of St. Johnsville and a portion of the adjacent lands. A committee was appointed to confer with H.C. Sauders, Geo. Chauge and Reuben Failing in reference to the purchase of a spring or springs located on the land of said H.C. Sauders.

-On August 13,1879 George Pitcher was approved to procure a surveyor to survey and make a map of the "Sauders Spring" and course of pipe to conduct water from the spring to the corner of Main and Union St.

-On August 28,1879 the Board of Water Commissioners paid $1800 to all the property owners interested in the water flowing from Cox Spring for a clear title to the spring and full release from everyone's right to the water. They were D.C. Cox in behalf of himself and H.H. Healy, Sam Knickerbocker in behalf of the Mill owners, and Solomon Miller in behalf of the 1st National Bank of St. Johnsville.

-September 20, 1879 the Board of Water Commissioners sold 10 bonds totaling $5126.62 at a public sale at the Empire House.

-September 25, 1879 Bids were presented to the Board of Water Com. For the contract for digging ditches, laying pipe and covering same.

-October 4, 1879 a contract was made with W.G. Vedder to dig ditches, lay and connect water pipe and fill the ditches for the sum of 53 cents per rod (16 feet).

-November 17, 1879 Willard Pickard was appointed water warden for the Village of St. Johnsville. Motion resolved that the rental of water be fixed at $3 per family and $6 for hotel use per Annum payable quarterly with each tap to represent one family with the water rates beginning December 1, 1879.

-December 1, 1879 George Pitcher was appointed a building committee to see that a building is erected over the spring.

-March 12, 1880 Gordon Hough was employed to dig the ditch, connect and lay water pipe down South Division St. from Union St. to the north side of Sauders St. at a price not to exceed 53 cents per rod with the pipe laid three feet below the surface of the street.

-April 5, 1880 new officers were elected- Nathan Briggs-president, C.P. Lampman- commissioner, C. Wilson-commissioner, Robert Pickard-commissioner. Motion made that a set rules and regulations be drawn up for the St. Johnsville Water Works.

-May 13, 1880 the following were approved rules and regulations-

No.1-the tapper or water warden or any authorized agent of the commissioners shall have full power to enter the premises of any consumers at all reasonable hours to examine fixtures and manner of using the water.

No.2-the tapping of the main pipes to supply service pipes for the conveyance of water to the premises of any consumer shall in all cases be done by the tapper or some competent person under his supervision.

No.3-All service pipe must be laid at least 3 feet below the surface of the sidewalk or roadway and kept in good repair at the expense of the owner.

No.4- was rejected

No.5-when the owners of any property are desiring of tapping the main pipes where the water is to be introduced, applications must be made to the Commission or water warden.

No.6-that there shall be one day in each week for which all who may wish the water have the privilege by notifying the tapers 3 days prior to Friday of each week and shall be done by the tapers between the hours of 1PMand 4 PM.

No.7-no person or parties supplied with water can allow any water to be taken from there premises without written permission form the Commissioners.

No.8-rejected

No.9-in case of fraudulent misrepresentation on the part of the applicant, or willful and unreasonable waste of water the Commissioners shall have the right to forfeit his payment and stop the supply of water.

No.10-the water rents shall be due and payable quarterly in advance 1st quarter March 1st, 2nd June 1st, 3rd September 1st ,4th December 1st and if any water rents shall not be paid within five days from the day where on the same shall full due and if payment is delayed beyond five days it shall be the duty of the tapers or water warden to turn water off and report the same to the Commissioners in which case the water will not be turned on until all back rents are paid and the additional expense for turning the same on again.

No.11-no tap exceeding inch in diameter will be inserted in the mains without a special permit.

No.12-rejected

No.13-the right is reserved to shut off any and all consumers in case of extensions, repairs or other necessity without any claims for damages for loss of water.

No.14-the Commissioners reserve the right to change the annual rates or alter rules and regulations as the interests of the Village of St. Johnsville may deem or the Commissioners may deem necessary.

No.15-no person shall open or interfere with the water pipes without permission from the commissioners or the water warden.

Also resolved that each house occupied by one family shall be charged quarterly for one tap.75 cents, each additional family.50 cents, stores and offices .75 cents, drug stores and saloons .75 cents, private stables for horses and carriage .50 cents. Any person who shall keep the water continually running shall be charged for 1/16 inch stream per quarter $1.50, 1/12 inch stream per quarter $2.00, 1/8 inch stream per quarter $2.50.

Resolved that the water warden purchase a set of tools for taping water to become the property of the village commission.

-June 24, 1880 James Fox was appointed temporary water warden in place of W.L. Pike.

-April 2, 1881 Schuyler Bros. Were allowed to tap the water main to lead water to their building on Railroad St. for $12 per year.

-May 24, 1881 elections held with the following officers elected B.A. Rausom-president, Alvin Saltsman-commissioner, Robert Pickard-commissioner, C.P. Lampman-commissioner.

-June 7, 1881 Albert Mitzger was appointed water warden. Motion to receive proposals for digging ditch 3 feet 3 inches deep and covering pipe in same ditch in Church St. from Main St. to Cottage St.

-April 3, 1882 elections with B.A. Rausom-president, Menzo Elwood-commissioner, Alvin Saltsman-commissioner, Aaron Smith-commissioner

-April 15,1882 Jacob Millington was elected water warden

-December 6, 1882 the following resolution was adopted-that any person or persons in the Village of St. Johnsville taking water from the Village of St. Johnsville water supply who shall allow a full stream from pipe and not close the faucet or stop cock immediately after drawing a pail of water, shall have the water supply cut off and stopped and shall not be allowed to draw any more water from the water supply of said village thereafter.

-February 5, 1883 Jacob Millington resigned as water warden.

-March 5, 1883 somewhere L. Bauder became water warden.

-May 7, 1883 elections held B.A. Ransom-president, James Egan-commissioner, Alvin Saltman-commissioner, Aaron Smith-commissioner. Resolved that $3 be charged for the use of water for building purposes, where the house is made of wood.

-June 4, 1883 James Astrom was appointed water warden

-August 11, 1883 Resolved that a double 3 inch iron pen stock be placed at the foot of Center St. near Main St. and that the same be at least 8 feet high above the ground and that it be cased, filled with sawdust and painted white.

-February 4, 1884 Absalom Thumb was appointed water warden.

-April 7, 1884 elections held with the following elected Gordon Hough-president, Delos Vosler-commissioner, Alvin Saltsman-commissioner, a motion was accepted to rescind the old rules and regulations of the water board and accept the following new rules and regulations:

I. all applications for water must be made for the water commissioners. If the application is granted, he shall pay the unexpired part of the years tax in advance.

II. All water taxes shall commence on the first of June in each year, except as in section I, and they shall be paid in advance to the collector, at the time of collection of corporation taxes, and the same fees shall be allowed the collector as in other taxes.

III. The rent for each stream 1/16 of an inch in diameter, shall be three dollars, and for every fraction on an inch over that amount, for each fraction so used, three dollars.

IV. Landlords who furnish water for tenants shall pay for each stream: three dollars for the first family, two dollars for the second, and one dollar for each additional family. Each party who allows other families to procure water at his or her pen-stalk shall be charged as tenants. Parties who pay water rents shall not be charged for water procured at other pen-stalks.

V. All water tax not paid to the collector within thirty days of the receipt of the tax list shall be held liable for the same in a suit at law as an ordinary debtor, or the commissioners may shut the water off to such delinquents, for one year as they may elect.

VI. The water wardens compensation shall be, for shutting off and turning on the water, one dollar, and for each days service when in actual employ two dollars.

VII. The water warden and commissioners shall have access to all taps or streams at all reasonable time, for the purpose of ascertaining quantity of water used, and for all rights granted to them by statute.

VIII. No rebates shall be allowed for the stopping the water while tapping or repairs. The warden shall shut off the water once in two weeks on Friday afternoon, for tapping, if so ordered by the water commissioners.

-July 8, 1884 somehow Christian Whyland became water warden

-August 8, 1884 Resolved that no permits be issued for water for building purposes until the supply be sufficient for domestic purposes.

--April 7, 1885 elections with Gordon Hough-president, Alvin Saltman-treasurer, Delfs Vosler-secretary

-April 8, 1886 elections held with G. Hough-president, L. Bauder-secretary, Robert Pickard- treasurer

-August 2, 1886 it was resolved that South Mechanic St. be supplied with water and that the Superintendent furnish the supplies.

-June 20, 1887 elections held as follows G. Hough-president, Robert Pickard-treasurer, O. Snell-secretary, C. Corte-commissioner. Martin Schram was chosen water warden

-April 2,1888 elections held as follows B.A. Ransom-president, Otis Williams-secretary, Clark Saltsman-treasurer, C. Corte-commissioner.

-April 30, 1888 resolution that B.A. Ransom draft a set of rules and regulations for government of water supply.

-May 14, 1888 the following rules and regulations were adopted:

I. All applications for water must be made to the water commissioners. If the application is granted, he shall pay the unexpired part of the years tax in advance.

II. All water taxes shall commence on the first of June in each year, except as in section I, and they shall be paid in advance to the collector, at the time of collection of corporation taxes, and the same fees shall be allowed the collector as in other taxes.

III. Hydrants, faucets, taps, hose, water closets, urinals, baths or other fixtures will not be permitted to be kept running when not in actual use, whenever this section is violated, the supply of water may be stopped and shut off without notice.

IV. Persons taking water must keep their own water pipes and fixtures connected therewith in good repair and protected from frost at their own expense; provide and put on a faucet to be kept closed so as to prevent the water from running except when necessary to draw for use, and no stream shall be allowed to run continuously except where the water shall be allowed to run by special consent of the board of water commissioners when the size of the stream shall be regulated by the board. Whenever this section or any part thereof is violated the supply of water may be shut off and stopped, without notice.

V. Whenever water shall be supplied to more than one party through a single tap the bill for the whole supply furnished through such tap will be made to the owner of the estate. In case of non-payment the water may be shut off without notice, not withstanding one or more parties may have paid their proportion to such owner or to any other party.

VI. All water tax not paid within thirty days after the receipt of the list by the collector shall make the person liable to pay such tax liable for the same in a suit as an ordinary debtor, or the commissioners may shut off the water as they so elect.

VII. The water wardens compensation shall be, for shutting off and turning on the water one dollar, and for each days service when in actual employ one dollar and fifty cents.

VIII. No private drinking trough or basin for animals will be allowed to be set in connection with the water pipes unless by special permit from the water commissioners, and in case permit is granted, the basin shall be of such kind or pattern as the commissioners shall designate, and arranged with such fixtures as the commissioner shall approve, and the supply or basins shall at all times be subject to the control of the commissioners. For noncompliance with this section the water supply may be cut off.

IX. The water commissioners, their agents, officers and assistants may enter the premises of any water-taker at any reasonable time examine the pipes and fixtures, the quantity of water used and the manner of its use. In case of fraudulent representation on the part of any water taker, or unnecessary waste of water, the supply of water will be stopped and the payment forfeited.

X. No rebates shall be allowed for stopping the water while tapping or repairing. The warden shall shut off the water once in two weeks on Friday afternoon, for tapping if so ordered by the commissioners.

XI. All shops, factories, foundries, and other places of business taking water shall take the same subject to these rules and regulations, and the rights of the commissioners to shut off and stop the supply of water on five days notice, whenever in their opinion there shall not be sufficient supply of water in the village for domestic purposes or they are compelled to do so by operation of law, without any other damage than a rebate, on demand, of tax paid for the remainder of the year.

XII. The commissioners reserve the right to modify or amend their rules and regulations, and to make such additional reasonable rules as may seem best to regulate the water supply, and such change shall not constitute the basis for a reduction of rate or in any manner affect the amount thereof.

XIII. Any person or persons or corporation taking or receiving a supply of water form the village shall take and receive the same under and subject to these rules and regulations and be governed by the provisions thereof although no reference be made thereto at the time of contracting on or for payment of the water tax.

XIV. The following is the water rates charged annually for water supply on property situate on the line of streets, alleys or business places through which water mains are laid which supply can be taken to be collected as above: each dwelling house occupied by one family with privilege of one faucet only-(3) three dollars; each additional faucet for use for same family-(1) one dollar; each additional tenant family from same faucet-(2) two dollars; every store or shop, except drug stores and barber shop-(2) two dollars; each additional store or shop from same faucet-(1.50) one dollar and fifty cents; private bath tub-one-(1.50) one dollar and fifty cents; each water closet-pull up or self acting-(2) two dollars; livery stable, for each stall, including washing carriage-(1) one dollar; drug store, first faucet-(3) three dollars.

XV. All other supplies of water shall be by agreement with or consent of the board of water commissioners under the provisions however of the foregoing rules and regulations.

All former rules and regulations of the board of water commissioners passed April 17, 1884 not incorporated in the foregoing rules and regulations are hereby rescinded and repealed. The foregoing rules shall take effect June 1, 1888.

-November 12, 1888 retaining wall built around old wall and extended up to bank to control all water from spring, volume of water supply doubled, increased from a 1 inch to a 3 inch stream.

-June 3, 1889 elections held with G. Hough-president, C. Saltsman-treasurer, C. Corte-commissioner, O. Williams-secretary

-April 5, 1890 elections held with Otis Williams-president, J. J. Reardon-treasurer, R. B. Beekman-secretary, C. Corte-commissioner

-May 15, 1890 resolved that a 2 inch water pipe be laid the entire length of Sanders Street and connected to the water main at the foot of Mechanic St.

-May 29, 1890 A. Metzger was awarded the bid to install the water line on Sanders St. for 13 cents per foot.

-August 4, 1890 motion carried to buy the water through of A. Nellis for $2 and place in position on Railroad St.

-November 6, 1890 resolved that a 2 inch pipe be laid on Hough St. connecting with the pipe on South Division St. and extending to the piano factory.

-April 29, 1891 elections held as follows Otis Williams-president, C. Corte-treasurer, F.S. Mosher-secretary, R.B. Beekman-commissioner

-May 4, 1891 resolved that the street known as John St. be investigated for the purpose of asserting how many feet of water pipe it will require to lay such pipe.

-June 3, 1891 resolved that a 2 inch pipe for conveying water be laid on John St. connecting with pipe on West Main St. and extending north 400 feet.

-April 4, 1892 elections as follows Otis Williams-president, C. Corte-treasurer, A. Saltsman-secretary, R. B. Porter-commissioner

-April 3, 1893 elections held with the following Otis Williams-president, A. Saltsman-treasurer, R. B. Porter-secretary, Frank Morey-commissioner. Motion made and carried to discontinue drilling for water at or near the Williams property which was being done by P.H. Foley.

-May 1, 1893 motion carried to continue the laying of the water pipe on William St. from Mill St. to John St. size of pipe to be inch. Resolved that an option be secured on land for a reservoir on the Williams property and contract with P. H. Foley for curbing and drilling for water on land.

-July 3, 1893 motion carried to purchase hemlock lumber from Z. R. Klock and Alex McLaughlin for twelve dollars per thousand feet. (believed to be for water main)

-July 7, 1893 a series of bonds were issued for the sum of $25,000

-July 15, 1893 motion carried to acquire a deed of the reservoir property land according to the option.

-July 27, 1893 resolved that the contract for construction be let to Small and Gallo for $6900.40. Pipe and specials to Jackson Moodie Co. for $12547.86. Valves and hydrants and appurtenances to Mood and Co. for $1775.00.

-August 12, 1893 Arthur Miller was chosen inspector in the building of reservoir, laying pipe, examining the same and digging ditches at a salary of $1.50 per day.

-September 4, 1893 Arthur Miller resigned as inspector, and L. Beekman was appointed at the same pay.

-September 20, 1893 motion carried to make a note of $5000 to Spraker Bank of Canajoharie.

-November 20, 1893 the following is a list of work and release to be made by Small and Gallo Contractors. Pipe to be covered next to the foot of the falls so as to have four feet of dirt at the bridge near R. Taylor's (?) mill on the north side so as to cover pipe 4 feet with dirt also cover overflow at reservoir.

-December 28, 1893 bills paid for water pipe 240 feet on William St $60, 187 feet on South Division St. $46.75, 354 feet on Hough St. $88.50, 585 feet on East Main St. $146.25, 400 feet on Spring St. $100, also hydrants were put in at Klocks (?), East Main St., Main and Monroe St, and Ann St.,

-April 14, 1894 elections were held as follows; Solomon Miller-president, Mr. Engelhardt-secretary and village clerk, Mr. Morey-treasurer, Mr. Pitcher-commissioner

motion carried that the commissioners be instructed to collect all keys belonging to gate and spring house (must be some kind of battle going on)

-April 21, 1894 clerk instructed to contact Mr. Gallo stating the board is ready to go on with the completion of the reservoir.

-May 22, 1894 motion carried that the curb cock, box and fittings known as the Jercki curb box, Glauber curb cock and " tapping cock be adopted for the village.

May 28, 1894 a new set of rules and regulations were adopted put not put in the minutes.

-June 11, 1894 motion carried that the water warden be instructed to open all hydrants beginning with those at upper part of system and let water flow from each until runs clear, then open clean out gates and let water out of reservoir and have same cleaned of all dirt and filth at once.

July 2, 1894 motion carried that Nelson House be allowed to take water from the hydrant in front of E. Church be used to sprinkle the streets.

-August 6, 1894 motion carried that the time of shutting off the old spring and turning the source into the pipes of the new system be extended to September 1.

-September 15, 1894 A committee was appointed to erect a shed or house over the pipe of the new spring at the old reservoir with suitable lock etc. so as to prevent interference.

-March 12, 1895 Geo. Pitcher was appointed secretary as F. Engelhardt resigned.

-April 26, 1895 elections held as follows Otis Williams-president, F. S. Mosher commissioner, Geo. Pitcher- treasurer, H.C. Keller-secretary and Ali Fox was the clerk

-May 6, 1895 resolved that estimates be received for 4 inch pipe on Lion Ave. and Spring St. and also estimate to cover the upper reservoir and lower spring

-May 13, 1895 motion carried that a water fountain be placed on West Main St. at once.

-June 27, 1895 motion carried that the contract for the extension of the water mains on Lion Ave, Spring St. and West St. be awarded to J. Morrell of Mohawk.

-August 5, 1895 on August 3, 1895 each member of the board of water commissioners was personally served by the clerk Mr. Fox with a certified copy of a certificate of special election of the qualified voters of the said village voting thereat held at the Engine House in said village, which notified them that at said elections taxes to the amount of $15,000 had been voted by said electors to be used (or so much thereof) as should be necessary for the purpose of an additional water supply system for said village and to take and acquire for that purpose the necessary lands and premises, streams, springs and water rights appurtenant to and connected with the stream of water passing through Lassellsville and connect the same by means of a pipeline, conduits and appurtenances to and with the water mains of said village. It was resolved that the board of water commissioners, by and in the name and for the benefit of the Village of St. Johnsville, make an additional water supply system for the said village. And it was further resolved that the said stream of water passing through Lassellsville be taken and acquired for said purpose, and be it further resolved that the same be intercepted on lands of Daniel Smith in the Town of Ephratah in Fulton County, NY and turned into an iron pipe or conduit line, laid in the ground from its place of intersection with said stream as aforesaid to its point of intersection with the present new reservoir of said village and then therein to its connection with the water mains of the said village now laid therein, with suitable and proper appurtenances attached or to be connected therewith. Frank B. Towman of Lowville, NY is employed to make proper surveys, maps, plans, specifications and drawings for $5 per day.

-August 7, 1895 bids were published to supply material and work involved in constructing the proposed additional water supply system from Lassellsville to St. Johnsville.

-August 10,1895 the board adopted the plans and specifications prepared Frank Towman, engineer of the additional water supply system.

-August 22, 1895 Walter Stanton of Wall Street New York City was awarded the $15,000 in water bonds. John Morrell of Mohawk was awarded the construction contract for the proposed additional water supply system. The cost of the pipe for the job was quoted at $8219.85.

-September 2, 1895 the map and orders prepared by Frank Towman, engineer, was approved and filed in Montgomery County Clerks Office and copy in Fulton County Clerks Office. It was also resolved that the board adopt and accept the said option of said Dempster of July 4, 1895, upon the express condition and provision, however, that the westerly line of said Dempsters premises between the same and one Congdon, is westerly of the small cheese or milk house now situate over the Spring stream of water by this board sought to be intercepted and taken where said Dempster represented the said line was when said option was prepared , and at and on prior occasions to members of this board and its agents so that said village will obtain the amount of land, location rights, and privileges which this board considered it was obtaining when the option was made.

-September 5, 1895 resolved that the board empower Frank Towman to offer Daniel Smith three hundred dollars as the offer of this board, for any and all claims and rights in and to the water sought to be taken and sufficient land for intake or settling basin, not exceeding one half acre.

-September 2, 1895 ordered, that this board, by its duly authorized engineer, assistants and servants, make an additional water supply system for said village and the inhabitants thereof, by diverting a certain spring stream of water, having its source on lands owned or occupied by Zelphi Dempster, Walter Congdon and Daniel Smith, in the Town of Ephratah, Fulton County, NY. And flowing therefrom over lands of, or occupied by Ezekiel Brownell, Emanuel Smith, Byron Walrath, Philip Michael, Edward Trumbull, John R. Bronk, Albert Kring, Zelphi Dempster and between lands of Cyrus Sponable, Lewis Smith and Elmer Dempster, and on lands of Henry Butler, and between lands of Adam Walrath and Ellison Johnson, and on lands of said Ellison Johnson, John Lassell, Ephraim Bronk, Chauncey and Lewis Smith and Henry P. Butler where it empties or flows into the Zimmerman Creek; that said stream be intercepted on lands of Daniel Smith by means of a diverting dam and turned into a conduit of cast iron or vitrified tile pipe line leading into cells beneath a gate house situate thereon, and thence conducted into and through a cast iron conduit or pipeline and appurtenances of 8 inch, 6 inch and 4 inch in diameter from said gate house cells, laid in the ground and covered, over and through lands of said Ezekiel Brownell, Byron Walrath, Philip Michael, Reuben Michael, Mary E. Smith, Joseph Dygert, Adam Weaver, Eli and Flora Smith, John and Nancy Trumbull, Stephen J. Duesler, Eugene Duesler and David Duesler in Fulton County, NY. and Jonathan Vedder and Herman Vedder and Adam Vedder in Fulton and Montgomery Counties NY., Romeyn Countryman lands of said village, Edwin S. VanDeusen and lands of said village known as the new reservoir lot in Montgomery County, NY. and along and across said highways in said counties and connecting to and with the water mains of said village within the new reservoir, which said pipeline will be about 28,400 feet long, as surveyed by Frank B. Towman, with assistants.

-November 4, 1895 on the resolution and map that was made on September 2, 1895 and filed in Fulton and Montgomery Counties on September 5, 1895 the following was added: ordered that this board requires, and it shall take and acquire for the uses and purposes of its said proposed water supply system, the lands, waters and streams hereinafter described and the interests therein respectively designated as follows; Lands situate in the Town of Ephratah, Fulton County, NY. owned or occupied by Zelphi B. Dempster, consisting of about twelve acres, bounded southerly by lands of one Daniel Smith, westerly by lands of one Walter Congdon, and northerly and easterly by lands of said Zelphi B. Dempster, together with the springs, streams and waters arising thereon and flowing therefrom and for which the said board have heretofore contracted with the owners thereof. Lands situate in the town, county and state aforesaid, adjoining the parcel above described owned or occupied by Walter Congdon, consisting of about one acre, bounded easterly by lands of said Z.B. Dempster, the parcel above described, southerly by lands of Daniel Smith, and westerly and northerly by remaining lands of said Walter Congdon, together with the springs, streams and waters arising thereon and flowing therefrom and for which the said board have heretofore contracted with the owners thereof. Lands situate in the said Town of Ephratah in county and state aforesaid, owned and occupied by one Daniel Smith, adjoining the parcels above mentioned and described to be acquired from said Dempster and Congdon and consisting of a parcel bounded and described as follows; commencing at a point in the northerly line of lands of said Daniel Smith, fifty feet westerly from the southwest corner of lands owned or occupied by Zelphi B. Dempster, and which point is marked by a stake driven in the ground and running thence, at right angles to and with the said north line of Smith (?) lands S 35 30' W one hundred and fifty feet to a stake, thence at right angles to and with the last mentioned lines N 54 30' W one hundred feet to a stake, thence at right angles to and with the said last mentioned line N 35 30' E one hundred and fifty feet to a stake driven in the said northerly line of Smith lands and thence along the said northerly line of Smith lands S 54 30' E one hundred feet to the place of beginning and such title to or interest in a strip of land of sufficient width not more than three feet for the laying beneath the surface of suitable and necessary pipes or other conduits for the carrying and conducting from the parcel of land above described along and upon the course in and by said original survey map resolution and order indicated and specified as now indicated by said pipeline to the point of connection with the water supply system of said village as therein designated, of a sufficient amount of water to supply said village and its inhabitants thereof with pure and wholesome water for domestic purposes and for protection against fire, and for all the purposes mentioned in and contemplated by the act under which said board is organized and acting, with suitable and necessary gate valves, outlets and other specials adapted to such conduit and conducting of said water as may be necessary for the proper use and enjoyment of said conduit or pipeline with the right to enter upon the said lands or lands adjoining thereto as may be necessary for the construction completion maintenance and repairs of said conduits or pipeline gates, valves, outlets or for the proper control of the flow of water through the same. The title or interests in the lands and premises herein before described and in and to the water springs and streams arising, issuing or flowing thereon or therefrom, which is to be required by said village, and for which said village has already contracted with the owners of the two first described parcels, with the right to take, lead and conduct the said water or as much hereof as may be or become necessary for that purpose, through the said proposed pipeline or conduit to said village and to furnish the said village and the inhabitants with a sufficient supply of water as herein before stated. The said water or stream or the portion thereof so required is to be lead or conducted in and through a covered stone or other suitable conduit from the springs and source thereof upon the first two described parcels, into and through a settling basin and cells in and covered with a gate house to be constructed upon the lands of said Smith(?) above described, and thence into and through the said pipeline or conduit leading to said village, and in connection with said land of said above described so to be acquired, they are also to acquire the right to enter upon and over and across the same as may be necessary from the public highway, for the purpose necessarily connected with the use of the said waters and streams and the control of the flow thereof.

-November 29,1895 Resolved that the board offer to the parties interested in the lands and streams or springs affected or claimed to be affected by reason of the said additional water supply system commonly known as the Lassellsville water extension system of this said village the following sums E&J Brownell-$100, Emanuel Smith-$150, B&T Walrath-$200, P&D Michael-$250, E&M Trumbull-$100, John Bronk-$50,A&J Kring-$50, Z.B. Dempster-$50, Cyrus Sponable-$50, L. Smith & A. Kring-$50, H.T. Butler-$50, Dr. Adam Walrath-$50, Ellison Johnson-$50,John Lassell-$50, Ephraim & Helen Bronk-$100, Chauncey & Lewis Smith-$50, Elmer Dempster-$50.

-December 5, 1895 Resolved that Frank Towman go to Tully, NY and interview Mrs. Amelia Bauer and she if she claims any interest in the property sought to be condemned and acquired in proceedings now pending against Daniel Smith, Nancy Smith and Tammie(?) Stewart.

-December 9, 1895 Frank Towman presented his findings with his interview of Mrs. Amelia E. Bauer, which appears to say it was her land somehow.

-December 26, 1895 Changes were made to money offered to the following people E&J Brownell-$150 instead of $100, B&J Walrath-$150 instead of $200.

-April 27, 1896 elections held as follows Otis Williams-president, F. S. Mosher-treasurer, H. Folmsbee- secretary, J. H. Reaney-commissioner.

-May 5, 1896 Motion made to pay Frank Anable the sum of $465 in full settlement for Congdon land according to contract. Motion made to pay Z. Dempster the sum of $1200 with interest from September 2, on receipt of deed according to contract.

-July 6, 1896 motion carried that Scott and Bram be allowed to use the hydrant at the corner of Main St. and Washington St to wet brick. Motion carried that the commissioners be instructed to notify all parties that have water taps outdoors to place same inside, all parties not doing so at once should be shut off.

-June 20, 1896 (out of order in minutes book, may be July 20, 1896) Motion carried that R. P. Anable be paid $150 in full payment for all water rights and pieces of land of Congdon according to agreement of May 28, 1896

-August 3, 1896 motion carried that the resignation of J. H. Reaney be accepted.

-August 14, 1896 Henry C. Keller somehow became a commissioner.

Whereas a special election of the qualified voters of the Village of St. Johnsville was duly held on August 1, 1895 for the purpose of voting on the question as to whether or not the sum of $15,000 should be raised by the board of water commissioners of said village for the purpose of building an additional water supply system and reservoir for said village by purchasing and leading to the water mains in said village a certain spring of water situate in the Town of Ephratah, Fulton County, NY. AND whereas said sum of $15,000 was duly voted to be raised by said qualified residents of said village and thereupon the said board of water commissioners duly raised said sum of $15,000 by floating therefor bonds issued upon and against the audit of said village and proceeded with the construction of said additional water supply system, to take and to acquire certain lands for the purpose of building said reservoir and to take and to acquire certain lands and water rights of Daniel Smith, Emanuel Smith, Edward Trumbull and others all persons with whom said board of water commissioners have been unable to settle for said lands and water rights so taken with completion of said water supply system. WHEREAS it has been necessary to commence condemnation proceedings to acquire said lands and water rights and necessary to employ counsel for the conducting and prosecution of said proceedings thereby incurring necessary debts and expenses by said board of water commissioners which debts and expenses could not be anticipated at the time said sum of $15,000 was voted to be raised by said village, the board is issuing bonds for the sum of $2,500 to cover the unanticipated expenses.

-October 27, 1896 Resolved that Geo. Butler confer with the mill owners on Zimmerman Creek commencing at Vedders at E. W. Scudder and extending to the Mohawk River and ask them if they considered themselves damaged by the village taken supply of water from Lassellsville spring and if so what extent.

-December 14, 1896 Resolution for money that gave the following money spent to date and other various pieces of information; on July 6, 1893 there was a special election for the construction of a water supply (believed to be the dome area) that was completed and accepted by the board of water commissioners on December 19, 1893 with a cost of $26,000. In 1895 due to increased water demands of the village because of constant expansion the board of water commissioners procured an additional supply of water by the purchase of land, springs and other sources of water in Lassellsville, Town of Ephratah (Congdon Springs) which was completed and accepted by the village on or about January 1, 1896 with an initial cost of $15,000. Due to condemnation proceedings regarding the Congdon Springs expansion an additional $2,500 was added to the cost. The resolution was to borrow money to add a water main on Averill St and School House street and for additional condemnation expenses for Congdon Springs with the total money borrowed being $5,000 as follows $2,500 for Averill St. and $2,500 for Congdon Springs.

-April 8, 1897 elections held as follows Otis Williams-president, Wm. Brooks-secretary, H. Folmsbee-treasurer, F.S. Mosher-commissioner, H.C. Keller-commissioner

-July 5, 1897 payment for land settlement to Wm. A. Walrath for $38.

-August 23, 1897 motion carried to contract A. Mitzger for tapping water mains.

-October 4, 1897 a $50 reward will be paid by the board of water commissioners of the Village of St. Johnsville to the person or persons who will furnish information that will lead to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons who broke the water pipe belonging to the said village leading from Lassellsville to St. Johnsville along the highway near the residence of Joseph Dygert.

-November 22, 1897 Resolution made to issue bonds in the sum of $4,000 for additional expenses to pay claims by reason of damages recovered for the taking of water on lands of Daniel Smith and formerly of Walter Congdon and J .B. Dempster.

-February 11, 1898 Resolution made Whereas it has come to the notice of the board that opposition is being made on the part of certain individuals or interests in this village, to the passage of the act heretofore prepared under the direction of this board, by Hon. John D. Wendell, council, authorizing the borrowing by this village of the sum of $12,000 for the purpose of paying the expense of condemnation proceedings and awards, and in connection with the extension of the water supply system of this village. This resolution was to be presented to the assembly and senate to be passed.

-February 19, 1898 Resolved that the board of water commissioners accept proposition of Wesley Dempster, dated September 7, 1897 and pay him $6,100 on delivery of all the necessary papers covering the release of all claims for damages by reason of the village taking water beginning at the village reservoir in Lassellsville and running along Zimmerman Creek excepting the claims of D. Smith, P&D Michaels and P. F. Nellis.

-March 17, 1898 motion carried to pay $100 to Jonathan Vedder for right to cross land under agreement of July 15, 1895.

-March 28, 1898 Resolved that the village issue bonds to the amount of $12,000 for the purpose of completing the construction of its additional water supply system and paying the expenses of awards and condemnation proceedings in and for purchasing, constructing, and maintaining said village improvement. Also somewhere elections were held and not recorded with results as follows Henry Walrath-president, Frank Gebbie, Clarence E. Taylor, William Brooks, Jacob Allter-commissioners, H. F. Stichel-clerk.

-April 4, 1898 two fire hydrants were purchased from R. .D. Wood & Co. for $49

-December 5, 1898 motion carried that water for 1898-1899 be granted free to the cemetery association.

-April 3, 1899 new officers F. Engelhardt-president, Frank Gebbie, C.E. Taylor, Gordon Hough, D.B. Youker-commissioners. W. Earl Youker-clerk.

-October 26, 1899 Moved that the Engine House water pipe be connected with the water main.

-April 2, 1900 new officers as follows I.E. Smith-president, Gordon Hough, J. J Reardon, James Roach, C.E. Taylor-commissioners. S.J. Scudder-clerk.

-May 7, 1900 Adam and Herman Vedder were paid $240 for damages on account of water being taken by the village.

-August 6, 1900 motion carried that the reservoir house be painted with graphite paint in its natural color.

-October 1, 1900 Moved that Mr. Albert Michael be paid $850 for his damages on account of taking water for village water supply in Lassellsville and that he paint the reservoir house free of charge.

-January 7, 1901 Moved to offer Mrs. Bronk $400 for damages sustained on account of taking water in Lassellsville.

-April 1, 1901 officers as follows I.E. Smith-president, C.E. Taylor, J. J Reardon, Wm. Brooks, James Roach-commissioners, S.J. Scudder-clerk

-May 6, 1901 Judge Keck and Mrs. Bronk appeared before the board in relation to the Lassellsville water damage claim

-September 9, 1901 Offer made to Mrs. Bronk on water damage claim for $550

-April 7, 1902 New officers as follows Frederick Engelhardt-president, Frank Towman-secretary, Laomi Beekman, William Brooks, John J. Reardon, James Roach-commissioners. Royal Mills Company was issued a permit to connect with the water main in New Street for sprinkling purposes only. Egison Crouse on North Division St. and Mrs. Milch on Mechanic St. were issued permits to make connections to water mains.

-April 14, 1902 Resolved that the street commissioner proceed to flush all hydrants, waste gates or blowoffs to the water system in the village.

-April 22, 1902 Mr. Daniel Smith requested that a fence be built about the Lassellsville intake property.

-May 5, 1902 Resolved that John B. Hadcock be allowed to use hydrants about the village for sprinkling purposes of the streets.

-August 18, 1902 Resolved the alterations be made in the water pipe arrangements in and about the Williams Reservoir (dome area) so that creek water may be let into the reservoir near the upper end and there properly governed by means of a suitable and proper gate and valves, and also extend and repair the intake of said creek connection. Also resolved that John B. Hadcock be ordered to discontinue the use of hydrant promiscuously for street sprinkling purposes and be confined to one hydrant on which he keep and maintain a suitable and proper gate on one nozzle of such hydrant so that said hydrant valve not be opened or closed more than once each day.

-September 3, 1902 Resolved that two men be employed to drill and blast out racks at foot of falls above Williams Reservoir for extension and improvements of creek intake.

-October 8, 1902 Frank B. Towman resigned as clerk F. J. Kornburst Jr. is now clerk

-May 4, 1903 officers as follows F. Engelhardt-president, L. Beekman, A. Snell, A. Dillenbeck, J. J Reardon-commissioners, F. J. Kornburst Jr.-clerk.

-June 1, 1903 Resolved that a citizen be appointed as water warden and that he be required to make a general inspection of the houses and places of business where the village water is used, it should be his duty one day in each week to make this inspection for which he shall receive $2 per day, Mr. John Wiles was appointed.

-June 5, 1903 Motion carried that F.B. Towman be employed to re-survey and stake out the plot and reservoir and spring at Lassellsville and estimate the number of feet of fencing that would be required to enclose same.

-April 4, 1904 elections as follows Frank S. Mosher-president, A. Dillenbeck, M. Crowley, A. Snell, H.C. Keller-trustees, M. W Snell-clerk.

-May 2, 1904 street commissioner Wiles requested that all shut offs be level with the street.

-February 14, 1905 agreement of the Village of St. Johnsville to furnish water to the NYC and HRRR Co. at passenger station at said village.

-April 3, 1905 officers as follows F.S. Mosher-president, H.C. Keller, M. A. Crowley, A. Snell, Geo. A. Allen-trustees, M. W. Snell clerk

-April 3, 1905 Resolution that J. H. Reaney be permitted to tap on water main on Bridge St. with a two inch pipe, providing he place a shut off on said pipe on outside of curb or sidewalk.

-March 26, 1906 Board organized as follows Jas. R. Fleeman-president, H. C. Keller, A. Snell, Geo. A. Allen, M. J. Warner-trustees.

-April 9, 1906 Attorney E. R. Hall addressed the board giving a brief outline of the Daniel Smith water case to date, and explained the necessity of petitioning the courts by motion for a reversal of the judgement now pending in the case.

-April 20, 1906 Resolved that all factories, saloons and hotels and public places in the Village of St. Johnsville be equipped with water meters by June 1, 1906.

-April 30, 1906 Resolved that the amount of water consumed by any one family in the Village of St. Johnsville shall not exceed 100 gallons per day. Resolved that the board of water commissioners adopt a meter system in said village to regulate and ascertain the amount of water consumed. Said meters to be installed where the board of water commissioners direct. Motion carried that the clerk correspond with neighboring villages relative to the amount charged per 1,000 gallons or cubic feet on water consumed in such villages.

-May 24, 1906 Resolved that all penstalks connected with the new water system and located on the outside of buildings be placed on the inside at the expense of the property owner within thirty days. Motion carried that the board Morrell Vrooman of Gloversville to make a test of the amount of water consumed by certain parties designated by the board. Resolved that the water tax rate be raised to $4 per tap for domestic use. Resolved that on all property where meters are installed at the expense of the corporation of the Village of St. Johnsville a yearly rental of 20% of the cost of meter installed shall be assessed and collected from said property owner for use of such meter. Motion carried that an appointed committee purchase the meters to be installed and placed so designated by the board to be quipped with meters. Motion carried President Fleeman be empowered to advise the necessary repairs to be made on the water springs at Lassellsville.

-June 18, 1906 Motion carried that Chas. Sanders be assessed $25 for the use of the village water for street sprinkling purposes for season of 1906.

-June 18, 1906 Erving Hillegas was allowed to tap water main on East Main St. Tax on the reservoir and lands in Lassellsville was paid for $11.

-July 25, 1906 the question of taxing the corporation of the Village of St. Johnsville per hydrant for use of the same for fire protection purposes was brought before the meeting with nothing acted on.

-August 17, 1906 Request of Mrs. Chas. Whyland asking that the Opera House building be metered.

-September 4, 1906 Resolved that the following tax rate be adopted and collected from property owners on which meters have been installed, for all amounts not exceeding 30,000 gallons per annum, 15 cents per thousand gallons, for each and every one thousand gallons exceeding 30,000 gallons per annum and not exceeding 80,000 gallons per annum, 10 cents per one thousand gallons, for each and every one thousand gallons exceeding 80,000 gallons per annum, 5 cents per thousand gallons. Claim of Joseph Dygert presented arising from the Village of St. Johnsville laying water pipe across his property and this was turned over to Attorney E. R. Hall for consideration.

-June 3, 1907 new officers as follows F. Engelhardt-president, H.C. Keller, N.F. Hough, M.J. Warner, A.B. Conover-commissioners, F. J. Kornburst-secretary.

-July 18, 1907 Motion carried that the award made in the Daniel Smith case of $1500.

-July 29, 1907 motion carried that Messrs., Thompson and Brown inspect the meters and see that they are in proper position to obtain the best results, and that they are in proper working order.

-August 8, 1907 the bid of W. H. Lenz for tapping the water mains for one year was accepted at the rate of $7.80.

-August 9, 1907 President Engelhardt was empowered to place a water meter upon the Box Factory on Hough Street at once or cause the supply of water to be cut off.

-October 14, 1907 W. H. Lenz having failed to file his bond as water tapper was revoked as contracting to do such work and replaced by Messrs. Thompson and Brown. Motion carried that F. Engelhardt be allowed to connect with the water main on Hough Street for use in the new factory building.

-January 6, 1908 Resolved that a deed be accepted by the village from Mrs. Selma Engelhardt of the property purchased by her of the Francis E Streeter, near the Lassellsville Spring and the sum of $627 be paid.

-February 3, 1908 Messrs. Thompson and Brown were authorized to read water meters.

-April 6, 1908 officers as follows F. Engelhardt-president, N.F. Hough, A.B. Conover, W.A. Van Deusen, J. F. Roland-commissioners, F. J. Kornburst-clerk.

-July 6, 1908 motion carried that the water main be extended to the corporation line on West Main Street be of 4 inch pipe.

-January 4,1909 somehow Henry H. Carroll is now president, A.B. Conover, J.F. Rowland, N.F. Hough, W.A. Van Deusen-commissioners, F. J. Kornburst-secretary.

-March 29, 1912 First annual meeting of the Municipal Board of Water, Light and Sewer Commissioners with the following officers elected; Joseph H. Reaney-president, Clinton P. Lampman, Merton C. Brown, Henry Taubman, Martin Walrath-commissioners. Motion carried that George A. Allen be employed as Water Superintendent at a salary of $60 per month for his services.

-April 1, 1912 Moved that a Bell telephone be installed in the residence of Superintendent Allen for his use as Water Superintendent, at a cost of not over $1 per month. Moved that a draft of the proposed rules and regulations be sent to the printer. Moved that the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad Company be notified that commencing June 1, 1912, and on and after that date their company would be charged for water supplied them form the St. Johnsville Water Works system at the meter rates and under the meter system of the Board of Water Commissioners. Moved that the rental charge to the Village of St. Johnsville Board of Trustees on fire hydrants for fire protection be $30 each on 67 hydrants.

-April 19, 1912 The Official Rules, Regulations, Ordinances and rates pertaining to the Water and Sewer Departments were adopted and will take affect on June 1, 1912. Moved that a mechanical device for recording water pressure on the St. Johnsville Water Works System be purchased.

-April 12, 1912 Motion carried that the board of trustees of the village of St. Johnsville, be requested to remove the water-trough at Kingsbury Avenue and locate the same at some place to be attached to the "old spring" water system. The rules, regulations, ordinances and rates were presented and submitted to the Board of Trustees of the Village of St. Johnsville. Motion carried that the rate to be paid for labor to be performed for the Municipal Board be 17 cents per hour, and the rate for teamwork to be 45 cents per hour.

-May 6, 1912 the board met with representatives from the Standard Meter Co. and National Meter Co. to present their respective water meters for the board's consideration. It was moved that 50 - 5/8" sapphire frost proof water meters form the Standard Meter Co. of Brooklyn, NY be purchased at a price not to exceed $9 per meter.

-June 1, 1912 the Water Superintendent was authorized to repair any water meter whenever necessary and wherever located. Moved and carried that no garden sprinkling be allowed with water form the village water system, but that lawn and yard sprinkling be allowed in accordance with the rules and regulations as adopted June 1, 1912. The board of trustees were to be notified to open the brick pavement on East Main St., near the property of Milford Crouse for the purpose of repairing a leak in the water main. Resolved that the board of trustees be notified that they must in all cases before using fire hydrants for street flushing purposes, first notify the water superintendent.

-September 23, 1912 discussion over the rate charged for the soda fountains in the Hall Block and in the store of Chris Limbers. F. Engelhardt and sons factory made protest of their water bill requesting that their two meters be billed as one meter. The Oppenheim and Ephratah joint school district tax was paid for 1912 totaling $27.58.

-October 21, 1912 Moved and carried that water meters be purchased for installation at the churches and public schools.

-December 14, 1912 Motion carried that the charge for soda water fountains are fixed at $7 per year. Motion carried that a device known as "The Detector" or pipe locator be ordered for use by the water superintendent in locating the position of pipes and water shut offs under the ground. A bill was paid to B&C Auto Co. for an auto rental to take a State Health Department Chemist to Lassellsville for $6.

-January 2, 1913 Moved and carried that the F. Engelhardt & Sons request to combine the two meter bills into one was denied and two meters will be billed.

-February 24, 1913 Resolved that all water closets connected with the village water system where the iron hopper style of closet is in use shall be metered.

-March 20, 1913 discussion of installing a 3 inch water meter for use on the F. Engelhardt & Sons factory elevator.

-April 14, 1913 elections as follows Joseph H. Reaney-president, Henry Taubman, Clinton P. Lampman, Merton C. Brown, Martin Walrath-commissioners. George Allen was appointed water superintendent for 1913 at $60 per month.

-May 19, 1913 Moved and carried that the water superintendent employ competent masons to point up and repair the old reservoir.

-July 30, 1913 Motion carried that Lion Manufacturing Co. be allowed to insert the sufficient amount of inch taps in the Hough St. main to supply the mill, work to be authorized by the water superintendent.

-August 29, 1913 Motion carried that Superintendent Allen repaint the fire hydrants throughout the village.

-October 14, 1913 Oppenheim-ephratah school tax paid for $26.01

-February 9, 1914 Resolved that the board of trustees be requested to submit at the annual village election t be held March 17, 1914, propositions to be voted on at such election for the acquiring of additional lands adjoining the water reservoir at Lassellsville, and for the construction of an additional storage reservoir to be paid out of moneys in the water fund.

-February 13, 1914 Resolution that Mr. F. E. Crane, civil engineer, of Amsterdam be engaged to make an estimate of a proposed new storage reservoir to be constructed adjacent or near the location of the present storage reservoir in the village (dome area) Motion carried that the village attorney interview Mr. E. S. Van Deusen relative to lands, or the securing of an option on lands upon which the proposed storage reservoir could be built.

-March 30, 1914 Elections as follows Joseph H. Reaney-president, Henry Taubman, Merton Brown, Clinton Lampman-commissioners, George A. Allen appointed water superintendent for 1914-1915 for $60 per month. Motion carried that the water superintendent locate and make proper record of all service water shut offs and also all water gate valves or boxes on the water works system.

-May 26, 1914 Notice to contractors of sealed proposals were requested for the construction of a new distribution reservoir on Zimmerman Creek near the Village of St. Johnsville.

-June 12, 1914 Resolved that the board of water commissioners recommend to the board of trustees, that the lands known as the old agricultural works property or lands owned by Martin Williams in the town of St. Johnsville, north of the village be purchased upon which to construct and erect the new additional storage water reservoir proposed.

-June 15, 1914 Resolved that the bid of R. F. Relly of Saranac Lake, NY for $11,880.65 be accepted for the construction of the new distribution or storage reservoir

-July 15, 1914 Resolved that a concrete retaining wall be built along Zimmerman Creek at the southerly end of the new storage reservoir, northerly of the village.

-March 30, 1915 elections as follows Joseph H. Reaney-president, Henry Taubman, Clinton P, Lampman, Merton C. Brown, Martin Walrath-commissioners, George A. Allen reappointed water superintendent for 1915-1916 for $60 per month. Mr. John Cook, civil engineer, of St. Johnsville proposed to make a map showing the water and sewer systems, pipe locations, hydrants, house Y branch, valves etc. for $300.

-June 14, 1915 Motion carried that the minimum charge for water consumed by meter measurement for icehouses be fixed at $4.80 per quarter.

-August 30, 1915 Motion carried the bid form Fayette B. Smith of $290 be accepted for fencing around the reservoir property, also the bid of $50 for an iron pipe fence on the walls of the storage reservoir.

-October 18 1915 Motion carried that a salesman from Neptune Meter Co. visit for the purpose of supplying a meter for measuring and registering supply of water being received into the storage reservoirs. Moved that an estimate be obtained of the cost of laying 4 inch cast iron pipe from the old spring to north division street and making connection with the water main.

-October 25, 1915 Moved that a 4 inch Trident Crest Meter be purchased at $160 and fish trap for use with same for $15 to measure water form the source to the storage reservoirs.

-February 5, 1916 billed paid to R. L. Cline for livery hire taking State Health Inspector to Lassellsville for $4.

-March 29, 1916 Elections as follows Joseph H. Reaney-president, Henry Taubman, Martin Walrath, Alvin Saltsman, Merton C. Brown-commissioners, George A. Allen reappointed water superintendent for 1916 at $60 per month.

-October 2, 1916 Motion carried that all water meters installed in the Engelhardt-Seybold plant be removed and examined to determine whether such meters had been tampered with and water fraudulently obtained without full payment. Also moved that a bill be rendered to Engelhardt-Seybold Company for water used and graudently taken from the water system from and through the sprinkling system.

-October 9, 1916 Village attorney was ordered to take up the matter of claims against Engelhardt-Seybold Company for use of water without full payment and employ a water expert engineer if necessary.

-January 25, 1917 Resolved that the flat rate for water on a tap for one family use be $3.50 per year, and new meter rates were adopted.

-April 13, 1917 elections as follows Joseph H. Reaney-president, Henry Taubman, Merton C. Brown, Martin Walrath, Alvin L. Saltsman-commissioners, George A. Allen reappointed water superintendent at $60 per month.

-April 13, 1917 A communication from Village President, James R. Fleeman was read relative to the necessity at this time of placing guards of properly guarding the village reservoirs, owing to the country being at war. It was moved and carried that water superintendent Allen be directed to personally inspect the village reservoirs twice daily until further notice.

-June 18, 1917 Moved that an estimate be obtained on the cost of new water pipe to lead from the old spring. Moved that a notice be sent to all property owners on North Division St. and Center Street not already connected with the village and sewer mains to have such connections made within 10 days of notice.

-April 16, 1918 Elections as follows J. H. Reaney-president, Merton Brown, Martin Walrath, Henry Taubman, Alvin Saltsman-commissioners. William Crangle-clerk

-July 28, 1918 George Allen was appointed water superintendent for $70 per month.

-November 3, 1918 Mr. Crangle resigned as board clerk and Mr. Brown was appointed to fill the position.

-April 15, 1919 Elections as follows J. H. Reaney-president, A. L. Saltsman, Merton Brown, Frank Ottman, Martin Walrath-commissioners, George Allen appointed water superintendent for $70 per month. Wm. Crangle-clerk.

-June 16, 1919 Motion carried that the water line be extended from Liberty Street to Hough Street over and across the land of J. D. Cairns.

-June 27, 1919 Motion carried that the pipeline from Liberty St to Hough St. go over and across the land of Charles Bellinger.

-September 2, 1919 Motion carried that the property owners on Hough St. Ext. be notified they have 48 hours to connect to the water main.

-March 23, 1920 elections as follows Joseph H. Reaney-president, Merton Brown, Frank Ottman, A. L. Saltsman, M. Walrath-commissioners. Motion carried that Ogden Butler be appointed for the position of keeping water board records, collection of rents and making out bills for $200 per year.

-March 31, 1920 Jacob H. Schiemer was appointed Superintendent of water, light and sewer systems and have the general charge and management of said system under the direction of the board of water commissioners and receive a salary of $100 per month.

-February 28, 1921 a committee was appointed to see about repairing and putting a line fence around the reservoir at Lassellsville. Motion carried to have an engineer make a map of the village property at Lassellsville.

-April 11, 1921 No elections talked about but officers as follows Joseph H. Reaney-president, Martin Walrath, Frank Ottman, Merton Brown, William H. Lenz-commissioners. Moved that the water superintendent constructs a building over the spring owned by the village near the Mohawk Condensed Milk Company and that he raises the wall 18 inches on one side.

-September 27, 1921 A committee was appointed to wait upon the Little Falls Felt Shoe Company and arrange with them to discontinue the operation of the elevator in their factory by water. Motion carried that a sufficient number of meters be purchased to meter all unmetered users in the village.

-April 12, 1922 Elections as follows Martin Walrath-president, Merton Brown, Frank Ottman, W. H. Lenz, Otis Williams-Trustees.

-May 5, 1922 Motion carried that any repairs to water meters that are necessary due to neglect of the homeowner, the expense shall be charged to the homeowner.

-May 12, 1922 George Allen was appointed water superintendent for $70 per month.

-June 2, 1922 The phone was removed from the past water Superintendent Jacob Schiemer and installed in the present water superintendent's house George Allen with the bill being paid by the water board.

-September 1, 1922 A committee was appointed to visit the park and order the pipe into the swimming pool changed.

-April 21, 1923 I. S. Devendorf was appointed water superintendent at $80 per month.

-July 6, 1922 elections as follows due to death of president Hon. Martin Walrath, Merton Brown-president, Frank Ottman, W. H. Lenz, Otis Williams, L. D. MacWethy-trustees. NYC was to be notified to install a self-closing valve on the urinal at the Depot. Lester Timmerman was to be notified to close the faucet emptying into his watering through when not in use. A committee was appointed to estimate the cost of laying a water pipe from Center Street to the Dairymens League Building.

-February 14, 1924 motion carried that owing to the scarcity of water, the waters of the creek be turned into the reservoirs. Also that the inhabitants of St. Johnsville be notified of the low water condition now existing and advise all to boil water as a precaution.

-April 4, 1924 elections as follows Frank Ottman-president, W. H. Lenz, E. J. Miller, David Walsh, F. J. Waltamath-trustees. The method of sending water bills was changed to a post card method.

-April 18, 1924 an engineer was to be employed to furnish estimates for the installation of water and sewer on Crouse Blvd. Motion carried to go to Lassellsville to look over the acquisition of more water and employ and engineer to furnish the data. I.S. Devendorf was reappointed water superintendent.

-May 1, 1924 motion carried that water be extended to the Dairymens League by extending the pipe from Center St. to the plant with the project to started immediately.

-May 9, 1924 the pipe and material necessary for water and sewer to be laid on Crouse Blvd was ordered. Committee appointed to make necessary repairs to preserve the efficiency of the reservoir at the Lassellsville spring. The attorney was instructed to procure options on several springs available at Lassellsville.

-June 6, 1924 Motion carried that Engineer Trumbull be employed to stake out a new intake dam at Lassellsville on the site of the present watershed, and also present plans and specification of the proposed construction.

-June 6, 1924 the land and springs of Albert Miles totaling 97 acres was contracted for the sum of $1500.

-June 13, 1924 James P. Wells was employed to make a preliminary survey of the entire water supply for $750.

-July 8, 1924 All property owners on Averill St., Washington St., West Liberty St., Monroe St., and Union St. were to be notified to connect with the water and sewer lines before the streets get paved.

-July 22, 1924 a resolution was adopted for a special election to be held to the borrowing of $170,000 for additional water supply for public use by connecting several springs and streams of water located in the Town of Ephratah, Fulton County with the election being August 5, 1924.

-July 22, 1924 Village Attorney Butler advised the board that he believed $12,000 would purchase all the land needed for the water system improvement. Engineer Wells gave a talk that he believed 300,000 gallons of water was available from the springs on the properties of Messers, Miles, Kretser and Fical. Mr. Wells advised laying an eight inch pipe which would carry 800,000 gallons of water per day and the cost of this would be approx. $132,900.

-July 29, 1924 Motion carried that the water line be extended on Averill Street north to the village limits.

-August 8, 1924 The Village of St. Johnsville Board of Trustees was to be notified that the Municipal Board will hold them responsible if the water main on Averill St. should freeze owing to the lowering of the street level by grading for pavement. The chairman was authorized to sign and verify a petition to the New York State Water Control Board to obtain proper consents to construct proper additional water supply system. Motion carried that James P. Wells of Rochester, NY be hired as engineer on the proposed water supply system for $9,350 lump sum payment to pay only his own services, and all preparations of plans and specifications and other items as part of the items before the State Water Control Commission.

-August 19, 1924 the taxpayers voted in favor of borrowing the $170,000 for 34 years and the bonds were sold to Sherwood and Merrifield of New York City.

-September 4, 1924 Bids were opened for the construction of the additional water supply with H.W. Golden & Son Inc. from Troy, NY being the low bid of $55,590, also the bid from U.S. Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry Co. of Philadelphia, PA be accepted to furnish the pipe for the cost of $52,616.

-September 17, 1924 Motion carried that the petition to the water control board of the State of New York, for permission to construct the proposed water supply system of the Village of St. Johnsville as duly adopted by the voters according to the plans and specifications prepared by James P. Wells, Civil Engineer, be amended so as to include a request for permission to sell and furnish to the inhabitants of Lassellsville water from the mains of the proposed additional water supply system.

-October 10, 1924 Water Superintendent was empowered to repair several bad leaks and charge the homeowners if they do not repair the leaks themselves within a reasonable length of time.

-October 31, 1924 the contracts were signed with U.S. Cast Iron & Foundry Co. and H.W. Golden and Sons Inc. for the additional water extension. Pittsburgh Testing Laboratory was employed to inspect all pipe furnished by U. S. Cast.

-November 5, 1924 the water superintendent was empowered to extend the water main on South Division St. as far as required to supply National Knitting Machine Co. (Johnson) with water. J.H. Schiemer applied for pipe inspector on the new pipeline.

-December 12, 1924 a committee composed of W. Trumbull, Frank Walrath, E.C. Trumbull and John Leek, representing Lassellsville, presented a proposition that would give the inhabitants of Lassellsville, water furnished them by the Village of St. Johnsville, in turn for certain considerations, with the water to be used for domestic and fire protection purposes.

-April 3, 1925 elections as follows Frank Ottman-president, W.H. Lenz, E.J. Miller, F. J. Waltamath, David Walsh-commissioners. I.S. Devendorf was reappointed water superintendent for $85 per month. Right of way was purchased over the following properties for the water line - Floyd Smith, Norman Smith, Eli Smith, Albert and George Weaver, Maggie Walrath, Julia Gray, Arthur Trumbull, Joe and Thomas Triumpho, Frank Seaman, Ed Miles, Murray Duesler, Maggie Walrath, Bruce Nellis.

-May 1, 1925 more right of way purchased W.R. Trumbull and Dan Weaver.

-June 5, 1925 suggested to use 6 - 1 inch Mueller automatic air valves on the water line. Right of way of Elmer Dempster paid.

-August 25, 1925 George Butler was empowered to do all things necessary to secure additional right of way across land of Ed Miles.

-September 4, 1925 right of way secured with Carrie Doland and Ed Miles.

-December 10, 1925 J.P. Wells stated that the new water system was nearly completed and would be finished in another week.

-March 30, 1926 Motion carried that the Rules and Regulations for the Protection from contamination of the public water supply of the Village of St. Johnsville as compiled by the Department of Health of the State of New York be adopted in their entirety.

-May 12, 1926 elections as follows Frank Ottman-president, W.H. Lenz, David Walsh, F. J. Waltamath, C.C. Walrath-commissioners. I.S. Devendorf was appointed water superintendent.

-June 4, 1926 No Trespassing signs were to be posted about the lands of the St. Johnsville Water Department.

-June 25, 1926 Daniel Smith has a claim in regards to building a fence on his lands alleged to be used.

-July 20, 1926 H.W. Golden & Sons Inc. was paid their final payment for the water system extension work.

-August 8, 1926 I.S. Devendorf water superintendent salary was increased to $100 per month.

August 26, 1926 Motion carried to purchase the land of Daniel Smith surrounding the two reservoirs including the right of way from the state road to the village lands for $800.

-December 11, 1926 Clark Weaver was offered $125 for a right of way across his property for the new water line in the Towns of Ephratah and Oppenheim.

-May 5, 1927 elections as follows Frank Ottman-president, David Walsh, F. J. Waltamath, W.H. Lenz, Chas. Walrath-commissioners. I.S. Devendorf appointed water superintendent. President Ottman was empowered to make application to the State Board for a permit to complete the Miles and Fical Springs intake as per plans and specifications already filed.

-September 2, 1927 Motion carried that Fay Trumble be offered $6000 for the 122-acre farm along Zimmerman Creek.

-October 25, 1927 Motion carried that the water to the Union Knitting Company, and the property of H.D. Allter on North Division St. be shut off for lack of payment. The president was empowered to make application for an extension in time for cleaning up the watershed and make all necessary work to make the watershed in a sanitary condition. The decision was received from the NYS Water Power and Control Commission that its request for the acquisition of two certain springs (Fical and Miles) in the application of August 9, 1924 was rejected.

-December 2, 1927 a representative from Wallace and Tiernan Co. of Newark, NJ explained in detail a chlorinating system suitable for use for drinking purposes. Motion carried that the chlorine control apparatus be purchased for the price of $450. The board agreed to offer the sum of $3000 for the farm of Lyman Cromer on Zimmerman Creek.

-January 6, 1928 the president was empowered to get an option on the Radley home near Lassellsville on the Zimmerman Creek. A bill was paid to ET Barnum Co. for wrought iron fence $140.70 and 1 pair of double gates $446.25 this is believed to be the present gates at the Congdon Springs entrance.

-March 2, 1928 Final payment made on the purchase of the Lyman Cromer property along Zimmerman Creek.

-April 6, 1928 elections as follows Frank Ottman-president, William H. Lenz, Fred J. Waltamath-commissioners. William Wilsey-clerk. I.S. Devendorf appointed water superintendent. Edward Hall was present to discuss damages of the village taking water. The matter of reforestation was discussed with the decision to procure sixty thousand trees for planting. The board was to advertise for bids on the removal of the building on the recently purchased Trumbull and Cromer farms. Motion carried to offer $2000 for the Sutton farm located on the watershed.

-June 5, 1928 motion carried to accept the bids of Clarence McCarther and Clarence VanGorder to remove building from the Trumbull and Cromer farms. Resolution to purchase the Roy Sutton farm of 47 acres for $2300 and also the Mary Radley house for $1000.

-September 7, 1928 Motion carried that all claims of property owners upon the creek below the small intake, in the Town of Ephratah, be offered settlement upon the basis of the original settlement for damages at the time of construction of the water works.

-June 7, 1929 elections as follows Frank Ottman-president, W.H. Lenz, Frank Waltamath-commissioners. I.S. Devendorf appointed water commissioner. Motion carried that $1 be paid per trip to each man who responded to the two alarms of fire on the watershed property at Lassellsville during the summer of 1928.

-July 5, 1929 resolution for President Ottman to apply to the NYS Conservation Commission for classification for taxation of forest land and reforested land. Motion carried that a six inch waterline be installed starting at Lion Ave at the corner of Crouse Blvd. easterly to the New York Central Rail Road CO. property and their water tank with the rail road to supply all valves and meter.

-August 24, 1928 the village board authorized the municipal board to offer Mr. Arthur Cromer $2000 for 57-acres of property in the watershed.

-October 4, 1929 A resolution was made to the following land owners for water taken by the Village of St. Johnsville from a stream known as Dempster Creek- Dempster, Leonard Brinell, Lois Mead, -Eva Carter, -Maggie and Frank Walrath, -William Trumbull, -Helen Trumbull, -Edward Trumbull, -Jennie Helen, Raymond King, -Lelah Smith, -Elmer Dempster, Jennie Fay, Alice Denure, Louise Weaver, Leonard Dempster, Bessie Dempster, Nellie Kennicott, -Grace Smith, -Francis Hill, -Pearl and Francis Getman, for the total amount of money being $1580. Resolved that the map of the water supply system of the Village of St. Johnsville that was filed in the Montgomery County Clerks Office on September 3, 1929 be filed in the Fulton County Clerk Office.

-October 10, 1929 Contract was made with the New York Central Railroad Company to supply them with water.

-January 27, 1930 Resolution regarding the filing of the map with Fulton County was described as follows: the water supply system of the Village of St. Johnsville showing the lands bordering upon Zimmerman Creek in the Town of Ephratah, commencing at a point where Dempster Creek runs into Zimmerman Creek extending northerly and easterly up to and including the dam constructed and owned by the Village of St. Johnsville, and including the lands back of the said dam not owned the Village of St. Johnsville but flooded by the dam. Resolution in compliance with condemnation proceedings to offer the following land owners a total of $1600 for taking water: Leah Smith, -Norman Smith, -Norman Smith, Edward and Lydia Miles, -Norman Smith and Charles Getman, - John and Mary Dolan, -Clifford Argersinger, -Floyd and Lizzie Cool and Norman Smith, -Floyd and Lizzie Cool and Floyd and Carrie Miles, -Norman Smith (sawmill lot), -Norman Smith (triangular), -Norman Smith and Edward Miles, -Henry Fical, -Edward and Leaphy Bronk, -Laura Mosher, -Leah Smith, Wilbur and Emma Monk, -Myra Miles.

-May 13, 1930 elections as follows Frank Ottman-president, W.H. Lenz, F.J Waltamath-commissioners. I.S. Devendorf appointed water superintendent. Wm. Wilsey-clerk.

-October 6, 1930 Motion carried that the land comprising the headwaters of Zimmerman Creek, the waters which are now included in the St. Johnsville water supply system and known as Yauney property, and includes Yauney dam and being used for greater storage acquire the property for no more than $1500.

-October 28, 1930 Motion carried to purchase a new chlorinating apparatus from Wallace & Tiernan Co. Inc. for $706 to replace the one previously used and was destroyed in a fire on October 27, 1930.

-November 7, 1930 bill of $1500 was paid for the purchase of the Yauney property.

-December 5, 1930 New York Central Railroad Co. was notified the water department was ready to supply the railroad with water at the trestle.

-June 9, 1931 elections as follows Frank Ottman-president, W.H. Lenz, F. J. Waltamath-commissioners. Irvin S. Devendorf was appointed as water superintendent, Wm. Wilsey-clerk. Morrell W. Vrooman of Gloversville was to go over the watershed with the board and makes suggestions for changes. NYS Health Department recommended chlorinating the old spring along with the new supply.

-July 20, 1931 Mr. Vrooman offered his suggestions to the changes needed at Yauney Dam and to follow out the plan at once.

-September 14, 1931 Motion carried to purchase a combination chlorine and ammonia apparatus to further safeguard making the water pure from Wallace & Tiernan for $1250.

-October 22, 1931 Ezra Nellis was paid $300 to cut a hole in the dam- believed to be the mud valve in Zimmerman Dam to flush out sediment buildup behind the dam.

-December 10, 1931 Motion carried to dispose of a wood lot and brush land on the Yauney property, which were included in the land purchase.

-January 8, 1932 letter read to board of trustees from the NYS Dept of Health that our water at the present time was very satisfactory.

-February 12, 1932 the Municipal Board appeared before the Village Board of Trustees to explain the conditions as they now stand. The Municipal Board has bonds and interest due on March 1, 1932 and no funds to meet them, and request that the Board of Trustees arrange payment for them. The reasons of no funds available being that legal services and other matters connected with the additional water supply had been paid out from the general water fund and the amount needed at this time being $3000.

-February 29, 1932 as per a resolution of the Village of St. Johnsville Board of Trustees on February 26, 1932, the Board of Water, Light, Sewer and Parks Commissioners is being dissolved and abolished and these four branches will embodied in the Proceedings of the Board of Trustees beginning March 1, 1932.

-March 11, 1932 The Village Board of Trustees rescinded their resolution dissolving the Municipal Board of Water, Sewer, Light and Parks Commission as it was done without a public hearing as required by village and state laws and another resolution was made calling for the public hearing on April 8, 1932 for its dissolving.

-April 8, 1932 At the public hearing on abolishing and dissolving the Municipal Board of Water, Sewer, Light and Parks Commission, several citizens were asked by Mayor Rush F. Lewis to express their views regarding this proposition. Mr. L.D. MacWethy pointed out the importance of having someone in charge of water familiar with the details in connection therewith to avoid serious trouble pointing out some of the many things current water superintendent Devendorf is confronted with the watchful eye of the state authorities over our water system, the large area which the water superintendent has to cover to see that no pollution gets into our water and other various things to be considered.

Mr. Frank Ottman, current Municipal Board President, spoke at length on his experience in connection with the water system, and show in part the many duties of the water superintendent, and the real necessity for occasional trips to the reservoir and Lassellsville, which trips have been thought unnecessary by many, stating his opinion, that the combining of the positions of Street Commissioner and Water Superintendent was inadvisable, and the job of looking after the water was of too much importance to be neglected by having someone look after it who is not familiar with the system or requirements demanded by the state authorities.

Mr. William H. Lenz spoke of some of the problems the Water Superintendent has to handle and solve, calling attention to the miles of pipelines, unmapped, the location is only known by experience, the many valves for controlling the flow, unmapped, and other things not previously mentioned.

Mayor Lewis spoke of the necessity of advancing the water rates to pay claimants for damages already awarded and cases still being tried regarding the additional water system. No further action was taken at this meeting.

-April 22, 1932 A petition signed by 32 voters and taxpayers requesting to continue the present method of managing the water system, by a water commission, and not to merge the Water Superintendent with that of the Street Commissioner was read and laid on the table.

The official resolution was made by Lewis M. Fowler and seconded by John Maier to officially dissolve, abolish and terminate the Municipal Board of Water, Sewer, Light and Parks Commissioners. Motion was adopted to have I.S. Devendorf continue as Water Superintendent at the same salary. Motion carried to borrow $8500 to cover expenses and claims for water damages which have already been allowed in the condemnation proceedings against owners along Dempster Creek.

-May 13, 1932 Mr. I.S. Devendorf was appointed water superintendent at $85 per month. L.M. Fowler and Geo. A. Horning were appointed by Mayor Lewis as a committee to act on the water department.

-July 26, 1932 claims were paid against the taking of land and /or water to Pearl Lassell-$301, Wilber and Emma Munk-$301, Ed, Leapy Bronk and Dan Fitzgerald-$377, Grace Smith-$264.

-September 8, 1932 more settlements paid to Jennie Phelan and Raymond King-$380, Pearl and Francis Getman-$337, Frances Hill-$266.

-October 14, 1932 Resolution to purchase a parcel of land from Stephen Cromer, now being flooded by the waters of Yauney Reservoir for $100.

-December 9, 1932 the Library Trustees were granted permission to erect a bird fountain on the library property and the village would supply the fountain with water free of charge except in the event of an insufficient supply.

-February 24, 1933 Resolution made urging Senator Walter Stokes and Assemblyman L.J. Shaver to support the bill which has for its purpose the exemption from local taxation of all municipally owned and operated water pipelines which lie without the Corporate limits of the Municipality which owns or controls same.

-April 3, 1933 Annual elections held with I.S. Devendorf appointed Superintendent of Water, Park and Sewer at a salary of $100.

-August 25, 1933 Mayor Lewis appeared before the Board of Assessors of Oppenheim to ask for a reduction of real property taxes on approx. 500 acres from $20 an acre to $10. The Assessors advised there would be no reduction.

-December 14, 1933 Resolution asking the Federal Government for full payment of all labor costs for the construction of a water pipeline from the village reservoir (dome) to the vicinity of Spring Street and the intersection of the present pipeline leading to the New York Central Pumping Station a distance of 10,000 feet to keep separate the two sources of water supply under the so-called Civil Works Administration (CWA) and the village purchase all materials needed. (commercial waterline)

-December 22, 1933 Discussion on trading a wood lot at Yauney Dam to Sheldon Nellis for 20 acres of his property which lies close to Yauney Dam, no definite conclusion reached.

-December 29, 1933 Resolution made to purchase the 8 inch pipeline to go to Spring Street as the Civil Works Administration project was approved. Resolution made to purchase a right-of-way across the land of Bruce Nellis for $50 for this waterline.

-January 12, 1934 Communication from Hulbert Explosive Co. that the village needs to purchase 2000 lbs. of dynamite for the CWA pipeline project. Resolution to purchase 44 acres of land from Sheldon Nellis for the even exchange of a 20 acre lot owned by the village, the 44 acres described as follows: bounded on the north by Stephen Cromer, south by Benjamin Kretser and Thomas Gleason, west by the highway.

-January 29, 1934 Warranty Deed received from Bruce Nellis and Ella B. Nellis for a right-of-way for the new pipeline from the village reservoir to the village.

-February 14, 1934 The clerk was instructed to purchase a suitable car for the water department for an amount not to exceed $100. Resolution that adjustments be made to the March 1 water billing due to the severe cold weather and low temperatures prevailing as the water commissioner has freely advised water consumers to allow water to run during severe cold nights to avoid freezing.

-April 2, 1934 annual elections with I.S. Devendorf appointed Water Superintendent for $100 per month.

-April 23, 1934 the Water Superintendent was asked to place a red printed card at every residence to be affected by water shutoffs for water main repair work.

-May 3, 1934 an agreement was reached to run the new 8 inch water line across the New York Central Railroad Company property from Sanders St. to the present waterline leading to the railroad water tower for no rental fee.

-May 29, 1934 the clerk was advised to notify all plumbers of the village that no water is to be turned on or off for any resident of the village until the matter is taken up with the water superintendent or clerks office.

-June 12, 1934 Motion carried that a map be made of the water and sewer system.

-June 27, 1934 Mr. Reaney wished to install two fountains, one in the park facing New Street and the other on Bridge Street and that each be metered and charged commercial rate as it would be off the commercial line.

-July 23, 1934 Motion carried that 1250 feet of 3 inch wrought iron pipe with necessary valves and fittings at a cost of $18.28 per 100 be purchased for the connecting the water supply to the St. Johnsville Supply Company's gravel plant with the new 8 inch pipe line recently laid (commercial line) and is to be laid in connection with the curbing along William Street.

-September 7, 1934 Howard C. Winne was approved to purchase sand and gravel from village property in the vicinity of Zimmerman Creek intake and offered to 5 cents a cubic yard.

-November 27, 1934 Communications from the State of New York, Department of Public Works, Engineering Division, advised that the sample of sand taken from the sand bank at the watershed in the Town of Ephratah of Sept. 8 had been analyzed and accepted for specifications of the Division of Highways. Agreed that all fire hydrants will be covered with a barrel and filled with straw to prevent them from freezing.

-April 1, 1935 annual elections with I.S. Devendorf appointed Water Superintendent for $100 per month.

-November 11, 1935 Ed Miles presented a proposal for purchasing 10 acres of land adjoining his property and which does not affect the watershed was considered.

-December 9, 1935 Ed Miles purchased 10 acres of land previously sold by him to the village for $150

-January 13, 1936 Mayor Lewis reported work on the Watershed project to start January 14 with 21 men, eventually 50 men, federal contribution $14,170 and sponsors contribution $2224.

-January 27, 1936 the clerk was instructed to order from the New York Conservation Department, 200,000 three-year old seedlings to be used in reforesting a portion of the watershed.

-February 14, 1936 the New York Conservation Department was allowed to use 2 acres of the watershed in Lassellsville for experimental purposes. Clerk reported the making up of W.P.A. project proposal for reforesting on the watershed and the building of approx. 385 feet of road from the highway to the lower reservoir.

-April 6, 1936 communication read from the New York Conservation Department stating a change had been made in the order of the village for trees for reforesting with the following now being supplied: 90,000 white pine, 85,000 red pine, 25,000 white spruce. I.S. Devendorf was appointed water superintendent at $100 per month.

-November 9, 1936 communication read from the NYS Dept. of Health regarding regional schools for water works operators and superintendents.

-November 23, 1936 NYS Dept. of Health suggested that a ventilator be provided so the fumes from the gas heater may escape in the plans to renovate and repair the scales and other equipment in the chlorinator house.

-January 26, 1937 I.S. Devendorf was instructed to offer Bruce Nellis the sum of $50 to settle his claim of his calf drowning in the village reservoir.

-March 8, 1937 clerk reported 30,000 white pines, 1,000 white spruce, and 1,000 white cedar were ordered from the New York State Conservation Department for use in the watershed.

-April 5, 1937 elections held with I. S. Devendorf was appointed water superintendent at $100 per month.

-April 19, 1937 Mayor Lewis reported one truck load of 32,000 trees was received from the Conservation Dept. for planting on the watershed.

-October 11, 1937 Claude Bierman, St, Johnsville Postmaster, requested furnishing the Post Office with water.

-April 4, 1938 elections held with I.S. Devendorf appointed water superintendent for $105 per month.

-April 18, 1938 the ongoing claim for several years of Norman Smith against the Village of St. Johnsville for damages to lands by reason of flooding along Zimmerman Creek by the construction of the diversion dam in the Town of Ephratah was agreed settled for $2400 and the village to also purchase 100 acres of land from Norman Smith along Zimmerman Creek being a strip of land between parcels owned by the Village of St. Johnsville and constituting a strip on either side of Zimmerman Creek east of the diversion dam for $3500.

-November 14, 1938 Resolution to purchase 34 acres of land from George K. Dorn for $200 with the Village of St. Johnsville exchanging a 30 acre piece of property on the south side of Rte 29 previously acquired from the Fay Trumble farm purchase.

-April 3, 1939 elections held with I. S. Devendorf appointed water superintendent at $105 per month.

-April 17, 1939 Resolution of the Village Board to the Conservation Department of the State of New York relative to turning over to the State, lands now owned by the Village of St. Johnsville in the Town of Ephratah, Fulton County know as its watershed. With the understanding that NYS will forever keep it forest and protect the waters for use by the Village of St. Johnsville. This being done as the Village of St. Johnsville has had considerable trouble with tax assessments upon the lands owned by the Village of St. Johnsville in the watershed and proceedings to lower the rate of assessment are ongoing. (unknown what the response to this was, other than the village still owns it)

-February 26, 1940 15,000 more trees were ordered from the NY Conservation Department for use in the watershed.

-March 25, 1940 Edward Miles purchased a 21 acre parcel of land in the watershed near the Congdon Springs area for $200.

-April 1, 1940 elections held with I. S. Devendorf appointed water superintendent for $105 per month.

-August 26, 1940 Alonzo Smith was hired at $3 per month for a complete inspection of the waterline each month.

-April 23, 1940 letter read from NYS Health Department about a cross-connection of domestic and commercial water near the towers of NY Central RR Company.

-April 7, 1941 elections held with I.S. Devendorf appointed water superintendent at $105 per month.

-August 25, 1941 Bernard Feldstein, Health officer, stated the importance that a map of the water works be made available showing every valve and shutoff.

-October 13, 1941 I.S. Devendorf was given a leave of absence as water superintendent due to ill health.

-November 10, 1941 Roy Nellis filled in as water superintendent for $20 per month.

-December 7, 1941 World War II started

-December 12, 1941 Roy Nellis was appointed Superintendent of Water, Park and Sewer Departments.

-April 6, 1942 annual elections with Roy Nellis appointed Superintendent of Water, Park and Sewer Departments for $105 per month.

-June 28, 1942 Health Officer Dr. Feldstein spoke of the necessity for the instruction of one or more additional persons in the operation and maintenance of the water system.

-July 13, 1942 Water Superintendent Roy Nellis and Asst. Water Supt. Horman were to attend a 3 day school for water commissioners at Albany.

-August 14, 1942 the Water Superintendent was to be covered by Compensation Insurance Policy now carried with the State Ins. Fund.

-December 2, 1942 Resolution made to lower the water rates being charged and were set up May 13, 1932.

-December 14, 1942 the salary of Water Superintendent Roy Nellis was increased to $120 per month for the duration of the war.

-December 28, 1942 Clark Burkdorf made an offer of $200 for timber on the Yauney Lot at the watershed above a 10 inch tree but this was tabled.

-December 30, 1942 a 1935 Ford Panel Truck was purchased from Willard Ottman for $275 for use of the Water Superintendent.

-April 5, 1943 elections with Roy Nellis appointed Water Superintendent for $120 per month and Street Supt. Duane Horman Asst. Water Supt.

-April 12, 1943 the village purchased four $1000 war bonds from water dept. funds.

-September 13, 1943 a load of wood from the watershed was given to the Observation Post.

-January 24, 1944 communication in regard to the use of chlorinator from Klock Park as a stand-bye was read and that the necessary parts and labor are authorized in order to use the Chloroclock apparatus for stand by. One $1000 war bond was purchased with surplus money in the water fund.

-April 3, 1944 elections with Roy Nellis appointed water superintendent for $126 per month and Police Chief Raymond Walrath appointed Asst. Water Supt.

-November 13,1944 the Minister of the Scotch Bush was allowed to cut up to and no more than 10 cord of wood from the dead wood at the watershed, while under the water superintendents supervision. The Village of St. Johnsville joined the American Water Works Association for $15 annually.

-November 27, 1944 Melvin Gray was appointed Asst. Water Supt. And Street Supt. The previous motion to rebuild the Chloroclock apparatus was rescinded and a new Wallace & Tiernan Co. chlorinator was to be purchased for $350.

-April 2, 1945 elections with Ray Nellis appointed Water Superintendent for $126 per month and Street Supt. Melvin Gray as Asst. Water Supt.

-April 24, 1945 the Water Committee was to contact the Cools relative to selling their property adjacent to Yauney Dam.

-June 12, 1945 decided that the village should try to get W.J. Crangle to exchange the property on North Division St. known as Scudders Falls for the McCrone lot on Sanders St.

-March 13, 1946 Little Falls Felt Shoe requested that a valve be installed on the main water line on Hough St.

-April 1, 1946 elections with Ray Nellis appointed Superintendent of Water, Park and Sewer Dept. for $138.60 per month salary and Raymond Walrath and Robert Perry Asst. Water Supt.

-May 14, 1946 Ray Hillegas was given permission to dig a ditch on West Main St. to repair the water line to his gas station and replace the street in accordance with specifications of NYS Dept. of Highways.

-June 25, 1946 clerk was instructed to type a list of work to be completed by the Water Supt. Including getting the swimming pool ready, flush the waterlines from Lassellsville to the Reservoir and clean out the reservoir at North Division St.

-July 9, 1946 a 10 % raise was given to all department heads including the Water Supt.

-August 13, 1946 NYS Dept of Health recommended purchasing a new chlorinator of rebuild the present one.

-September 23, 1946 a new Wallace & Tiernan Chlorinator was purchased for $1645.

-January 28, 1947 Roy Nellis resigned as Water Superintendent. Arthur Handy was appointed new Water Supt. For $152.46 per month.

-April 2, 1947 elections with Arthur Handy appointed Water Superintendent for $152.46 per month and Robert Perry, Raymond Walrath and Melvin Gray appointed Asst. Water Supt.

-May 27, 1947 a new 1947 Ford pickup was purchased from Willard Ottman for $1077.93 for use of the water dept.

-August 12, 1947 NYS Dept. of Health Engineer Taggart was glad to se both reservoirs were being chlorinated.

-October 28, 1947 a $200 salary increase was given to all Dept. heads including the Water Supt.

-November 25, 1947 Mayor Dievendorf invited a group of business men to meet with the board and Engineer Vrooman to discuss the need of a new domestic reservoir.

-December 9, 1947 it was decided that a new reservoir be constructed for domestic use. A resolution was made to bond for $35,000 for 20 years for this construction.

-January 20, 1948 Morrell Vrooman was retained as consulting and designing engineer in connection with the planning and laying out and general supervision of construction of a water storage reservoir for a fee of $2800.

-February 16, 1948 Resolution authorizing the construction of a new reservoir for the water supply system at a total estimated maximum cost of $40,000 with $35,000 in bonds used and $5000 in surplus water funds.

-February 24, 1948 water usage rates were increased for domestic users to $7 every six months for any quantity of water consumed less than four thousand cubic feet and any excess shall be charged at the current rate schedule.

-April 5, 1948 elections held with Arthur Handy appointed Water Superintendent for $194.48 per month and Melvin Gray, Raymond Walrath and Robert Perry as Asst. Water Superintendents. Arthur Handy has been accepted as a Grade III water treatment plant operator. Letter from Palatine Dyeing Co. Inc. requesting a second connection to the 8 inch commercial water supply line.

-April 7, 1948 previously purchased war bonds totally $6000 were cashed in for the new reservoir construction.

-May 28, 1948 bids were opened for the new standpipe (dome) with Weber Construction Co. from Schenectady being low bidder at $43,463.

-August 27, 1948 a geophone for locating leaks and a tunneling scoop were purchased for the water dept.

-October 26, 1948 Morrell Vrooman discussed the water rate structure with a plan to compile a new rate schedule for both commercial and domestic users.

-November 9, 1948 an agreement was signed for cooperation under the Forest Practice Act for the watershed.

-December 14, 1948 a bronze plaque was ordered to be placed on the new standpipe (dome) for $72.54.

-December 28, 1948 Arthur Handy died. Duane Horman was appointed temporary Water Supt. At the salary of $194.48.

-January 4, 1949 Duane Horman resigned as Water Supt. Barlett McGee was appointed temporary Water Supt. For $194.48 per month.

-February 8, 1949 the New York State Conservation Dept. advised that the badly damaged timber in the watershed would be marked and cut, also that there is a possibility of enough timber on the north side (11 acres) to warrant commercial operation and they would cruise the same and cooperate in getting this done. The board agreed to have the Conservation Dept take care of this.

-February 22, 1949 a new Philgas heater was purchased for the chlorinator plant for $25.75.

-April 5, 1949 elections with Bart McGee appointed Supt. of Water, Park and Sewer Dept. for $194.48 per month and Raymond Walrath and Robert Perry are Asst. Supt.

-May 25, 1949 agreed upon that all workers, no matter what department or type of work being done will be paid 80 cents per hour.

-August 23, 1949 a 1949 Ford pickup was purchased from Willard Ottman for the water dept. for $1452.50, and a row boat was purchased from Leo Fitzpatrick for $30 for use at Yauney Dam. The Pitometer Co. from New York was hired to check the water system for leaks.

-September 27, 1949 Floyd Cool was allowed to clean out the tops that were dropped at the watershed when the trees were cut. Palatine Dyeing Co. would like to purchase more water from the village is the supply and pressure would be adequate, and it was decided to ask for bids to clean out the commercial supply line.

-October 12, 1949 Morrell Vrooman, Engineer, was authorized to draw plans and specifications for the repair to Yauney Dam, cleaning Zimmerman Dam, and install necessary blow offs and valves on domestic system within the village.

-October 22, 1949 Pittsburgh Pipe Cleaning Co., being the low bidder at $2487.50, was hired to clean the commercial waterline.

-October 26, 1949 Fred Clemons Jr. was contracted to clean out Zimmerman Dam for $1750. Advertisements were to be published for the repairs and reconstruction of Yauney Dam and Zimmerman Dam.

-November 14, 1949 Fred Clemons Jr. of St. Johnsville was awarded the bid for the work at Yauney and Zimmerman Dam for $11,892. (Yauney Dam work was the building of the valve house and installing bypass pipes)

-December 27, 1949 Fred Clemons Jr. was paid $1081.85 for sluicing Zimmerman Dam. (believed to be adding the current mud valve)

-January 24, 1950 resolution adopted for bonding an additional $11,000 for additional expenses on construction of the standpipe reservoir (dome)

-April 5, 1950 a pipe locator was purchased for $149.50. elections as follows with Bart McGee be appointed Water Supt. for $194.48 per month and Melvin Gray, Raymond Walrath and Robert Perry are Asst. Water Supt.

-April 18, 1950 12 acres of land was purchased from William and Jesse Cool in Lassellsville for $500. Motion carried that legal action be brought against the New York Central Railroad Company for monies owed for the use of water from October 10, 1934 to June 1, 1948.

-May 9, 1950 new water rates proposed by Morrell Vrooman were adopted.

-August 8, 1950 Mayor Lampman requested a vote be taken that Supt. of the Water Dept. Bart McGee be requested to resign his job for insubordination, but the vote was not taken as he was given a second chance.

-October 10, 1950 George Flanders from Shelp & Warner appeared to quote the cost for furnishing and erecting a Quonset building over Congdon Springs but no action was taken.

-December 12, 1950 Alfred Hayes was contracted to tear down existing spring house building at Congdon Springs and build a new building for $1400.

-December 26, 1950 Fred Clemons Jr. was hired to supervise the cleaning of the storage reservoir for domestic supply. (Congdon Springs)

-January 23, 1951 Bart McGee resigned as Water Supt. effective February 1, 1951. It was decided to try and combine the Street Supt. and Water Supt. jobs and offer the job to Melvin Gray.

-February 13, 1951 Arthur Galusha was appointed Supt. of Water, Park and Sewer Dept. for $233.32 per month.

-March 13, 1951 hourly employee wages were set at $1 per hour.

-April 2, 1951 elections held as follows Arthur Galusha was appointed Water Supt. for $233.32 per month with Melvin Gray, Raymond Walrath and Robert Perry appointed Asst. Supt.

-June 26, 1951 clerk was instructed to send a letter to Road Supt. Ed Johnson, Town of Ephratah, to have the town repair roads to Yauney and Zimmerman.

-July 10, 1951 3 gate valves and boxes were purchased for 3 new blowoff valves to be installed on the southside of the village.

-December 11, 1951 letter was read from Morrell Vrooman relative to a filtration plant for the water works.

-March 25, 1952 the Street and Water Supt. was combined into the Superintendent of Public Works with Arthur Galusha appointed this position for $3500 per year.

-April 1, 1952 elections held with the Superintendent of Public Works position officially made permanent. Arthur Galusha was appointed Supt. for $333.33 per month. Raymond Walrath and Robert Perry were appointed Asst. Supt.

-September 9, 1952 the NYS Dept. of Health advised the village board that Chris Satterlee and the Village Inn in Lassellsville, must discontinue using village water without chlorinating.

-October 28, 1952 Morrell Vrooman Sr. discussed the problem of treating the commercial water to make it suitable for use by Palatine Dyeing Co. Inc. Morrell Vrooman was hired to make a study of the quantity and chemical content of the water.

-December 9, 1952 a Mueller Tapping machine was purchased for the water dept.

-April 6, 1953 elections as follows Arthur Galusha was appointed Supt. of Public Works for $333.33 per month. This was done after an executive session as Melvin Gray returned from his illness and requested to be reappointed to his position of Street Supt. as he was before his illness and the board combined the water and street supt. position. The board decided to keep the positions combined.

-April 14, 1953 hourly employee wages were increased to $1.15 per hour.

-May 26, 1953 the residence in Lassellsville currently tapped into the Village of St.Johnsville water line will be notified they must disconnect from this source within 60 days with this action motivated of necessity by advice to the Village of St.Johnsville from the village board of health and NYS Dept. of Health.

-July 28, 1953 the fire hydrant on West Liberty St. located between the residence of Vincent Pontius and Edward Swartz was to be moved before winter at the request of Mr. Pontius.

-March 9, 1954 the clerk was instructed to contact Chris Satterlee of Lassellsville, allowing 30 days to make arrangements to secure water from another source, or his supply would be cut off form the village commercial water line. This was in accordance with instructions from the NYS Dept. of Health.

-April 6, 1954 elections held with Arthur Galusha appointed Supt. of Public Works for $333.32 per month and Raymond Walrath and Robert Perry Asst. Supt. Mayor Wilfred Kraft submitted a statement on the affairs of the village; there is approximately $75,000 in bonds outstanding for the water system and are being retired at about $7,000 each year.

-April 13, 1954 a new Aqua valve locator was purchased for the water dept. for $27.50.

-April 27, 1953 hourly employees were raised to $1.20 per hour.

-July 13, 1954 discussion on allowing water service extension to residences west of the Village of St.Johnsville on Rte. 5 and decided anyone interested should advise the clerk or mayor.

-August 24, 1954 Supt. Galusha discussed planned work and tentative expansion of the village waterline. (unknown where)

-September 14, 1954 Palatine Dyeing Co. requested permission to change the water supply of the North Division St. building from commercial to domestic main for fire protection.

-November 9, 1954 New York Central Railroad was advised it will be impossible to maintain the water line unless some agreement can be made as to more revenue.

-April 5, 1955 elections with Arthur Galusha appointed Supt. of Public Works and Raymond Walrath and Robert Perry Asst. Supt.

-April 12, 1955 a 6 inch blow off valve was to be installed on the end of Hough Street. Supt. Galusha requested a pay raise if one was given to the Police Dept.

-April 26, 1955 500 feet of wire mesh fence was purchased for the watershed from A. Horns & Sons. Decided to purchase 250 feet of cement asbestos 6 inch pipe to install the blowoff on Hough Street.

-August 23, 1955 a report from the State Conservation Dept. was read showing a tally of the timber which they marked for cutting on the watershed property, the estimate being 56,000 board feet of soft wood and 10,000 board feet of hardwood. Fred Clemons Jr. was contracted to cut the above timber.

-September 13, 1955 the State Conservation Dept. was allowed to plant 5000 jack pine trees at the watershed for $9 per 1,000.

-September 27, 1955 Palatine Dye Co. requested to be supplied with more water.

-October 11, 1955 Burgess Construction Co. was contracted to build a concrete dam at Yauney reservoir to increase the water storage, approximate height to be 2 feet at a cost of $620.

-October 25, 1955 Howard Smith of Lassellsville was allowed to clean the tops of trees left behind from the logging by Fred Clemons Jr. in the watershed.

-November 7, 1955 the Wallace & Tiernan chlorinator was sent back for repairs.

-November 22, 1955 a wall type Wallace & Tiernan chlorinator was purchased as a stand by for $700.

-February 14, 1956 a letter was from the State Conservation Dept. regarding disease of Woodgate gall rust on scotch pine trees at the watershed.

-April 2, 1956 elections held with Arthur Galusha appointed Supt. of Public Works for $333.33 per month, no Assistant Superintendents were appointed.

-April 25, 1956 decided that the commercial water meters were to be read every six months as the domestic meters are.

-September 25, 1956 Supt. Galusha that the fence around Congdon Springs had not been erected yet.

-April 1, 1957 organizational meeting held with Arthur Galusha appointed Supt. of Public Works for $4150 per year.

-May 28, 1957 C.J. Burgess & Co. Inc. was paid $1043.44 for laying waterline on Kingsbury Ave. A drinking fountain was to be purchased to be placed at the corner of Center Street and Main Street.

-October 22, 1957 the NYS Health Dept. stated that an assistant should be appointed and trained to take care of the chlorinator plant.

-December 10, 1957 H.B. Russelmann , District Sanitary Engineer, sent a letter regarding tapping on the 8 inch village water supply line to install hydrants for fire protection to families north of the Village of St.Johnsville, there was no action taken.

-April 7, 1958 organizational meeting with Arthur Galusha appointed Supt. of Public Works for $4150 per year and given three weeks vacation.

-April 22, 1958 Ralph Hill was considering accepting the position as Asst. Supt. of Public Works, pending completion of needed schooling required.

-June 10, 1958 Milburn Monk requested that a fence be built along the watershed and his property.

-June 24, 1958 discussion on the washing away of the south bank at the reservoir and of filling it in with flat stones or shale.

-August 12, 1958 Letter read from Eastern Lumber Company in regard to flooding of their lands at the village water reservoir and the boundaries of this land.

-September 9, 1958 Frank DeNure was contracted to paint the buildings at Yauney Dam, Congdon Springs and Zimmerman Dam. It was discussed to purchase a water meter flow tester but decided it was impossible for a meter to overcharge usage.

-September 23, 1958 problems were discussed with water pressure with the use of the water elevator at the Little Falls Felt Shoe Co.

-October 14, 1958 Frank Gehring representing Helmont Mills asked permission to connect to the commercial waterline. The board stated this line was in need of repair and recently had several breaks, but would be looked into.

-October 28, 1958 the St. Johnsville Supply Co. requested a 6 inch waterline be extended to their property.

-November 12, 1958 decided some consideration should be given to harvesting such timber that is ready to be cut at the reservoir so as to prevent timber deteriorating.

-December 9, 1958 Dr. Harold Attman, NYS Dept. of Health District Health Officer, advised that the commercial waterline could be brought into the Helmont Mills building as long as commercial and domestic water can not cross-connect.

-December 22, 1958 letter of resignation was read from Arthur Galusha as Supt. of Public Works.

-December 29, 1958 Donald Nellis was hired as an employee of the Dept. of Public Works at $1.35 per hour to learn the Supt. job.

-January 13, 1959 Ralph Hill was appointed Acting Supt. Of Public Works for $70 per week.

-January 27, 1959 letter was written to Montgomery County Civil Service Commission to make necessary arrangements to place the Supt. of Public Works under civil service. It was brought out that Helmont Mills would have to pay for piping from the existing water main and that the high content (does not say of what) was caused from the source of supply and that this should be taken care of by cleaning up the brush, dead trees, etc. near the source. A sluice gate had been purchased for Zimmerman Dam but never installed, and recommended that in order to over come the cause of the color trouble that considerable cleaning be done at the source of supply. Again a request was made of the need of harvesting timber in the watershed.

-February 10, 1959 Helmont Mills was authorized to tap the commercial waterline nearest their property.

-April 17, 1959 Carmen Giaquinto was appointed Supt. of Public Works.

-May 26, 1959 a new heater was purchased for the chlorinator plant for $75.

-June 23, 1959 preparations were completed for the cleaning out of Zimmerman Dam and installing the new mud gate. Milburn Monk was leased a right-of-way across Village of St.Johnsville watershed lands in the Town of Ephratah on a year to year basis at a rental of $1 per year.

-July 14, 1959 reported on how the Fire Department gave assistance in the cleaning of Zimmerman Dam and at the distribution plant. More brush will be cut at the reservoir. Discussion on using the domestic spring water in the swimming pool which would necessitate the commercial water to be used for drinking purposes, other sources were to be looked at first.

-August 11, 1959 in view of the fact that the Supt. of Public Works makes daily visits to the water works, the services of Mr. Alonzo Smith for inspection of the dams was discontinued.

-October 13, 1959 reported that Yauney Res. is again full of water and spilling over, and that approx. 500 feet of water pipe will be needed to bring fresh water to the marina.

-October 27, 1959 agreed if the water shut off is broken when the water meter is turned off, the cost of replacement is to be made by the village. ( believed to mean the curb valve). The Supt. is instructed to remove the board from Yauney Dam.

-November 10, 1959 Resolution asking the NYS Water Power and Control Commission for approval to increase in the storage capacity of Yauney Dam by placing a small dam, raising the spillway elevation.

-November 24, 1959 The Conservation Dept. gave permission to blow out the beaver dams. Supt. Carmen Giaquinto, Richard Shannon and William VanSlyke were to attend the Water Plant Operation Course in Albany.

-December 22, 1959 letter read from the Dept. of Audit and Control in regard to the Village of St.Johnsville assuming the cost of repairing private water supply lines between the curb cocks and water mains.

-February 23, 1960 State of New York Conservation Dept. stated the watershed lands are now enrolled under the Forest Protection Act and asked permission to establish such a plot in the red pine plantation bordering Rte 29 east of Lassellsville.

 

 

 

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